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1050d Ballistic Nylon vs. 1680 Ballistic Nylon: The Stoll Abrasion Test

Using the Stoll Abrasion test, we compared our 1050 ballistic nylon to the 1680 ballistic used by other companies.

The 1680 denier fabric failed after only 1055 cycles (black fabric); our 1050 denier fabric (red fabric) didn't fail until 2110 cycles. Bottom line: our 1050d Original HT U.S. ballistic nylon is twice as abrasion resistant imported 1680 ersatz ballistic nylon.

1680 "Ballistic" Nylon is commonly used on cheaper imported bags. It's woven to look and feel like the real thing, it's not the same stuff. While you might think it's a heavier fabric (1680 being a bigger number than 1050), the 1680 cloth is woven with a single ply of 1680 denier yarn, while the 1050 Ballistic is woven as a two-ply fabric (with two yarns woven as one — it could actually be called a "2100 denier" fabric). Additionally the 1680 yarns are generally not high tenacity nylon, resulting in the 1680 fabric having a lower abrasion resistance.

Imported 1680 ballistic nylon fabric after only 1055 cycles.
Imported 1680 ballistic nylon after only 1055 cycles.

Original U.S. high tenacity 1050d ballistic nylon after 2110 cycles.
Our (Crimson) Original High Tenacity U.S. 1050d ballistic nylon after 2110 cycles.

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