Results 1 to 10 of 10
Like Tree7Likes
  • 4 Post By SKIMT
  • 1 Post By Miking
  • 1 Post By Miking
  • 1 Post By TavaPeak

Thread: Do Laundry in Minutes - Without Using the Sink or Tub!

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    45

    Do Laundry in Minutes - Without Using the Sink or Tub!

    I decided to wait out nasty roads here in Montana and stay away on business a little longer than I had planned.

    What to do....I only packed for one night and ended up staying all week. I went to REI and picked up one of these and washed my clothes in the hotel with ease.

    I got the idea a few weeks ago where someone was showing off a laundry wash bag. Although I admire the ambition and am grateful for putting the idea in my mind, I found a 5L bag from the store up the street for $15 easier to get and far less expensive.

    Put an outfit in, little dab of shampoo, and some hot water. Moved it around for about five minutes, drained...did again for a rinse. Worked great.

    Lighter travel awaits now that I have discovered this!

    Any tips on getting clothes dry or a good travel clothesline that works well?

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Calgary Alberta Canada
    Posts
    304
    Stand by, I have a neat little DIY clothesline tutorial and a modification to your dry bag you might like coming soon!
    jmoz likes this.

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    245
    Quote Originally Posted by SKIMT View Post
    I decided to wait out nasty roads here in Montana and stay away on business a little longer than I had planned.

    What to do....I only packed for one night and ended up staying all week. I went to REI and picked up one of these and washed my clothes in the hotel with ease.

    I got the idea a few weeks ago where someone was showing off a laundry wash bag. Although I admire the ambition and am grateful for putting the idea in my mind, I found a 5L bag from the store up the street for $15 easier to get and far less expensive.

    Put an outfit in, little dab of shampoo, and some hot water. Moved it around for about five minutes, drained...did again for a rinse. Worked great.

    Lighter travel awaits now that I have discovered this!

    Any tips on getting clothes dry or a good travel clothesline that works well?
    When I do travel washing I use the "Travelon Set of 2 Inflatable Hangers, White, One Size"
    I usually pack two, and being inflatable across the width means that the front and back of a shirt do not stick to each other - therefor it dries quicker

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Calgary Alberta Canada
    Posts
    304
    Well I was bored tonight and so I decided to bash it out, here is the link: DIY Travel Clothesline
    SKIMT likes this.

  5. #5
    Registered User TavaPeak's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    410
    I take a small Micronet towel from Rick Steves. I roll a shirt or small items in the towel, and let it sit for a few minutes before hanging the item to dry on an inflatable hanger. The towel dries fast, has many uses. Mine has a loop and snap (hangs on the shower rod), and the bright color means it doesn't get confused with hotel linens. There are high-tech towels at REI etc., but this is the one I keep packing.

    Micronet Travel Towel - Rick Steves' Travel Store
    SKIMT likes this.

  6. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    45
    I'm going to pick up a towel then make a clothes line like mikings.

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Delaware.
    Posts
    249
    Quote Originally Posted by Miking View Post
    Stand by, I have a neat little DIY clothesline tutorial and a modification to your dry bag you might like coming soon!
    The clothes line is pretty great. I'm still curious about the dry bag modification. ;-)

  8. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    768
    Here's the travel clothesline I use:

    Travel Clothesline - Rick Steves' Travel Store

    These are the inflatable hangers I prefer:

    Amazon.com: Travelon Set of 2 Inflatable Hangers, White, One Size: Clothing
    Editor--One Bag, One World: News, Reviews & Community for Light Travelers. http://www.1bag1world.com

    Aeronaut(2), Tri-Star(2) Cadet , Large Cafe Bag, Travel Tray, Travel Money Belt, Absolute Straps(3), Side Effect, Clear Quarter Packing Cubes (2), 3D Organizer Cubes (4), Aeronaut & Tri-Star Packing Cubes, Clear Organizer Wallet, numerous Organizer Pouches,, Guardian Dual Function Light, Vertical Netbook Cache, Nexus 7 Cache, RFID Passport Pouch, numerous Key Straps.

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Calgary Alberta Canada
    Posts
    304
    Sorry about the delay, HERE is the link to the modification I made to the dry bag to make travel laundry easier. I use the bag as a dirty laundry bag and occasional inflatable pillow until it is time to use for laundry duty, the ridges really help but don't negatively affect the bag when it's not actively being used for laundry.

  10. #10
    Registered User gochicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    272
    Quote Originally Posted by TavaPeak View Post
    I roll a shirt or small items in the towel, and let it sit for a few minutes before hanging the item to dry on an inflatable hanger.
    Knitters often have to "block" their finished pieces which means to soak them and then stretch them out flat to dry with the help of pins and blocking wires. But a thick woolen item holds a lot of water, so the Yarn Harlot (Stephanie Pearl McPhee - a Tom Bihn fan as well!) recommends this:

    "Gather the knitting into a ball while it is still in the water, you don't want to lift it out so that it gets stretched or pulled out of shape while you are moving it. Lift it up, plop it onto a clean towel and wrap it in the towel. Step on it a couple of times to squish out the worst of the dripping sodden-ness."

    Of course with a delicate item, you'd have to be careful stepping on it, but I've found this to be a very effective and and gentle way to fast-forward to the "barely damp" stage before hanging or laying flat to dry.

    I've always just used regular cotton bath towels to roll up my items, but I do have a microfiber towel. Next time I'll add that in there too. Thanks, TavaPeak!
    Satisfied owner of: Azalea Swift & LS, Blk/Plum Swift, Cork LS, Blk/UV LS, Synapse 19 & Co-Pilot, Steel/UV Pilot, Fst/Stl Tri-Star, Fst/Blk/UV SA, UV PCSB, Plum SE, FJN, & SCB, Aubergine WF, LS & Kit, Trvl Trays, Passport Pouches, and Shop Bags in all colors , Multiplying OPs


Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0