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Thread: Very Old Travel Advice; or, How People Managed 533 Years Ago

  1. #16
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    It is a fundamental topic!

    Most travel to Europe or anywhere for that matter skip that topic and this is one thing that cannot be left hem... behind.

    The contrast between the availability of U.S and French facilities is staggering.

  2. #17
    Registered User nukediver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Badger View Post
    Raises hand.


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    Ooops, just realized that I never told the story. And apparently I've left you in terrible suspense for two weeks! Sorry....

    So, back in 2006, a group of us who spend a week each summer on a scuba diving trip had planned one of those "trips of a lifetime" to Australia and Papua New Guinea, where we would be spending three weeks diving the Great Barrier Reef and around the islands of Papua New Guinea. The first week of the trip was spent diving the Great Barrier Reef, which was A W E S O M E! Towards the end of that first week, I got sick. It wasn't just some run of the mill virus. It was epidemic-illness-contagion-movie sick. I wanted to DIE. I have never in my life been in such horrible pain. My bones hurt. My body ached. My head felt as though someone had split it open with a chainsaw, then left the chainsaw stuck in it, idling. I had vertigo, which is bad enough on dry land, but when you're living on a boat? Wow. I was feverish. And did I mention the nausea?

    Because we were traveling to (literally) parts unknown once we got to Papua New Guinea, and would be a day or so away from medical help, we'd all brought along a medicine cabinet's worth of OTC and prescription drugs. I took them all, with no result. I couldn't keep food down. I couldn't drink water. I wanted someone to shoot me. In the meantime, other people on the boat were getting just as sick. And angry with me, thinking I had infected them (I am now forever know in this circle of friends as "Patient Zero" or "Typhoid Nancy"). I didn't leave my cabin for 36 hours, only crawling out of my bunk in order to make it to the head (I'll spare you those details...). And did I mention the nausea?

    At some point mid-illness, and before she got sick, my better half remembered we had brought along a GIANT bag of ginger chews. Well, it was the only thing I could keep down, and I don't know if it was because of the ginger, or because the illness had run its course, by I gradually did begin to feel somewhat human again. Barely. The ginger really helped with the nausea (and prevented much vomiting, I am certain). I forever will associate ginger (in any form) with that trip, for better and worse. After about 40 hours, I felt human enough to go above deck and breathe some fresh air. This is what I looked like, after spending a few minutes cleaning up.

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    Right after this picture was taken, I actually got my snorkel gear on and jumped in the water, thinking that it would be refreshing. Against the surface winds and current, I valiantly swam out to the reef where the not-yet-sick were diving; as soon as I got there, they turned around to come back to the boat. Sigh. I drifted back on the surface current, climbed up the ladder, ate more ginger candies, and crawled back into my bunk. This was the pattern on the boat for the remainder of our time in Australia. People got sick. People got better. We flew to Papua New Guinea. We dove while sick, a definite no-no, but after what we'd all spent on the trip, there wasn't anyone who wanted to miss out on all the spectacular sites. Through it all, the one consistency was the giant bag of ginger chews - they helped everyone!

    One of my friends on that trip (who also got sick) is my chiropractor, a one-time ER nurse. When we got home, she did a little research and figured we probably had dengue fever. For real. So now you know...

    By the way, about a week later, on an unnamed island in Papua New Guinea, I was well enough to be doing this:

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  3. #18
    Volunteer Moderator Badger's Avatar
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    @ nuke.

    That was worth the wait. Epic story.

  4. #19
    Registered User nukediver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Badger View Post
    @ nuke.

    That was worth the wait. Epic story.
    I feel like I owe you a drink for making you wait so long :-)

  5. #20
    Registered User roarmouse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Badger View Post
    Raises hand.


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    Sooold.You win lot #1 comprising: A snort,cough,and 2 laughs out loud.Pay the lady..

    Check out poopreport.com for hilarous tales of yuckiness.

    Peace!

  6. #21
    Volunteer Moderator Badger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nukediver View Post
    I feel like I owe you a drink for making you wait so long :-)
    Oh, I think that the next time I'm in your neck of the woods, we'll be owing each other drinks.

  7. #22
    Registered User nukediver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Badger View Post
    Oh, I think that the next time I'm in your neck of the woods, we'll be owing each other drinks.
    Absolutely!

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