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  1. #16
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    I learned on 152's and 172's in Gainesville, Florida in 1980. Twelve years later I'm at SMO and see one of the planes I learned to fly in. My flight school had gone out of business and it was sold to a guy living in L.A. Small world.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by fbrown627 View Post
    I learned on 152's and 172's in Gainesville, Florida in 1980. Twelve years later I'm at SMO and see one of the planes I learned to fly in. My flight school had gone out of business and it was sold to a guy living in L.A. Small world.
    wow! small world, indeed!

  3. #18
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    Really? What school? I was at Claire Walters.

  4. #19
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    I was living near SMO at the time and was at American Flyers at SMO checking out Instrument training.

  5. #20
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    Whee!!! I'm so happy for you - nothing like that first flight! You have a pretty area for flying. We never flew into Leesburg, but we did fly down to Williamsburg a couple of times (from central NJ). Be meticulous with your pre-flight check on the airplane, learn as much as you can about how the mechanics of the airplane (so you will be able to spot potential problems), keep your head screwed on straight and you will be fine! ;-)

    Just wait until your first solo! A combination of being extremely happy, excited, and wondering if taking off was the dumbest thing you've ever done! They say that your first solo landing will be one of the best landings you ever make.

    Hubs and I learned in a Piper Warrior. I sat in the back seat on almost all his flights (maybe you can get your wife to do that if you are flying a 4 seater). We then bought a used Piper Archer (4 seats, 180HP). I also trained in a Cessna 152.

    How long is the runway at Leesburg?
    Last edited by Heidi Jill; 09-03-2009 at 04:25 PM.
    Happy owner of a medium cocoa Cafe, small plum Cafe, plum/green Utility Tote, black/purple Lux, mini cork pouch, mini kiwi pouch, mini clear pouch, small blue pouch, assorted key straps, prototype Stuff Sacks, and navy/storm/sapphire Imago!

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heidi Jill View Post
    Whee!!! I'm so happy for you - nothing like that first flight! You have a pretty area for flying. We never flew into Leesburg, but we did fly down to Williamsburg a couple of times (from central NJ). Be meticulous with your pre-flight check on the airplane, learn as much as you can about how the mechanics of the airplane (so you will be able to spot potential problems), keep your head screwed on straight and you will be fine! ;-)

    Just wait until your first solo! A combination of being extremely happy, excited, and wondering if taking off was the dumbest thing you've ever done! They say that your first solo landing will be one of the best landings you ever make.

    Hubs and I learned in a Piper Warrior. I sat in the back seat on almost all his flights (maybe you can get your wife to do that if you are flying a 4 seater). We then bought a used Piper Archer (4 seats, 180HP). I also trained in a Cessna 152.

    How long is the runway at Leesburg?
    thanks heidi jill!

    it was just beautiful up there this morning!

    i'm not scared of taking off. the landing is just a bit intimidating.

    they have a piper arrow iii and a diamond eclipse at aviation adventures that i'd like to try also. i think it'd like to get completely comfortable with the cessna 172s before i try other airplanes, though.

    the runway is about 5500 feet at leesburg.

    can i bring a passenger along while i'm a student flying with an instructor? i know i can't take a passenger on a solo flight until i have a private pilot's license.

    thanks!

  7. #22
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    My instructor let my Dad come along with us on a X-C. And every now and then, depending on what we were covering at the time, another student might ride along to observe.

  8. #23
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    thanks karl! that's good to know!

    Quote Originally Posted by KarlJ View Post
    My instructor let my Dad come along with us on a X-C. And every now and then, depending on what we were covering at the time, another student might ride along to observe.

  9. #24
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    Before you start looking at higher performance aircraft like the Arrow, stick with the basics. It would be like someone learning to drive on a Ford Focus with an automatic suddenly taking out a Corvette with a stick. A little more complicated to drive. Once you get your ticket, then think about learning to fly the Arrow with retractable gear and variable prop.

    When I was learning my school would only allow other flight students or instructors to go along on a flight lesson. They wanted you to focus on the lesson and not showing off to whoever was sitting in the back. And I'm glad. I've had a few "incidents" flying that could have turned out much worse than they did--such as me not being here. When they happened, my training kicked in and kept some bad situations from getting worse. Learning to fly means just that--not photography, not taking passengers, not worrying about bags. Concentrate on becoming a safe and competent pilot. As I was told on my first day..."There are old pilots, there are bold pilots, but there is no such thing as an old, bold pilot."

    Don't get me wrong...flying is a lot of fun. But it's also serious business.

    I'd also suggest joining AOPA. Yearly dues include their monthly magazine, "Flight Training." And you get a free flight bag--though not the quality of TB.
    Last edited by Frank II; 09-04-2009 at 06:12 AM.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by fbrown627 View Post
    Before you start looking at higher performance aircraft like the Arrow, stick with the basics. It would be like someone learning to drive on a Ford Focus with an automatic suddenly taking out a Corvette with a stick. A little more complicated to drive. Once you get your ticket, then think about learning to fly the Arrow with retractable gear and variable prop.

    When I was learning my school would only allow other flight students or instructors to go along on a flight lesson. They wanted you to focus on the lesson and not showing off to whoever was sitting in the back. And I'm glad I did. I've had a few situations flying that could have turned out much worse than they did--such as me not being here. When they happened, my training kicked in and kept some bad situations from getting worse. Learning to fly means just that--not photography, not taking passengers, not worrying about bags. Concentrate on becoming a safe and competent pilot. As I was told on my first day..."There are old pilots, there are bold pilots, but there is no such thing as an old, bold pilot."

    Don't get me wrong...flying is a lot of fun. But it's also serious business.

    I'd also suggest joining AOPA. Yearly dues include their monthly magazine, "Flight Training." And you get a free flight bag--though not the quality of TB.
    thanks fbrown627!

    i'm just excited! i'm also a photographer and love taking pictures in most every situation. i will learn to curb these tendencies while learning to fly and focus on learning to fly.

    and we're very glad that you're still around!

  11. #26
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    That's a nice long runway~we mainly flew out of an airport with a 3,500 foot long runway, but we both did a lot of practice landings at an airport with a 6,000 foot runway.

    I sat in the back for just about all of my husband's lessons and he did the same on mine. But we do just about everything together, so that wasn't odd at all for us. That was part of the reason he decided to learn in a Piper Warrior - so I could go along for the ride. Our flight instructor had no problem with that at all. Neither of us interfered in the other's training.

    I'd stay away from the Arrow - it's nice to have fixed landing gear, especially when you are learning!
    Happy owner of a medium cocoa Cafe, small plum Cafe, plum/green Utility Tote, black/purple Lux, mini cork pouch, mini kiwi pouch, mini clear pouch, small blue pouch, assorted key straps, prototype Stuff Sacks, and navy/storm/sapphire Imago!

  12. #27
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    Now that I've looked at the new Synapse (at least on this website), i would suggest you use that as your flight bag. It should fit everything, including headset, plus when you actually go out on your own, you can put it in the front seat next to you while the backpack straps go around the sides of the back of the seat--and even the waiststrap might fit around the back of the seat--to secure it in place. This way it won't go "flying" when you get bored and decide to do a few acrobatic maneuvers while aloft. And everything you need will be easily accessible.

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by fbrown627 View Post
    Now that I've looked at the new Synapse (at least on this website), i would suggest you use that as your flight bag. It should fit everything, including headset, plus when you actually go out on your own, you can put it in the front seat next to you while the backpack straps go around the sides of the back of the seat--and even the waiststrap might fit around the back of the seat--to secure it in place. This way it won't go "flying" when you get bored and decide to do a few acrobatic maneuvers while aloft. And everything you need will be easily accessible.
    hi fbrown627,

    thanks! yes, i could dedicate the synapse for that purpose. i like the idea of the different things that i would need inflight having a specific location. that is actually why i wanted to incorporate the freudian slip into the solution.

  14. #29
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    I can tell you that if you ask 100 pilots for bag opinions you'll get 342 unique answers. Having said that, I'll admit the Synapse looks a worthy contender. I've noticed however that backpacks don't seem to be as prevalent as opposed to an upright or rectilinear design. Just my observation... I know you'll find a solution that works of you, and who knows... you may be an innovator.

  15. #30
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    Pilot student on 172's, my husband is also a student pilot and I join him in most of his flights.

    I take pictures and learn a lot.

    He doesn't like to ride in the back so it is just me and the instructor during my lessons.


    I use the Brain Bag for flight school and the Backpack Packing Cube as a flight bag, I also bring my Small Cafe Bag in Storm/Sapphire (sky color all around and the small size forces me to pare down to the essential)

    I imagine the Dyneema Synapse would be an even better fit to the flight bag requirement.

    I use a Large Yarn Stuff Sack for my headphones, it is very light and Solar so that we don't forget it on the plane.


    A dedicated headphone bag with the lightness and water/dirt repellent quality of Dyneema and the protection found in the Cache would be ideal.

    What do you think of a product like this?
    Let's call it the "Sound Absorber". (yeah, you can make fun because I know that Tom and crew will come out with a cooler and better sounding name)

    It could be used not only by pilots but people who use noise canceling headphones in airplanes and in all kind of professions.
    It could also protect full size precision audio headphones.
    Last edited by backpack; 09-09-2009 at 02:12 PM.

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