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Thread: Small Nordic Dyneema Shop Bag saves the day

  1. #1
    Registered User ncb4's Avatar
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    Small Nordic Dyneema Shop Bag saves the day

    OK, first let’s get the blatant bid for sympathy over with. Here is a photo of Rowdy, the knee scooter that is saving my life. That bulky thing encased in purple sweatpants [which are the height of post-op fashion, by the way] is my leg; nine days ago I had the first of two surgeries to repair the shredded Achilles tendons in both my heels. [Right leg first, then left leg sometime next year.] I am currently wearing a plaster cast and am not allowed to put even an ounce of weight on the leg for four weeks. Which is driving me crazy!

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    All right, I’ll stop fishing for sympathy now. The point of this post is actually the Small Nordic Dyneema Shop Bag sitting in Rowdy’s basket. Somehow the Shop Bag seems to magically expand the capacity of the basket. It also adds a touch of organization. My favorite use of it is to separate wet things from electronics. It makes me nervous to put my thermal mug of tea or water in the same basket with my iPhone 6, my iPad Air, or my Macbook Air. But it's vital for me to consolidate trips, because the longer I'm on the scooter, the more likely it is that I'm going to do something stupid and fall. [Believe me, it's happened already.] So I slip the mug in one of the bottle pockets inside the Shop Bag and make sure that the geeky gadgets are outside the bag when I am clumsily wheeling around. So if I do topple the mug while trying to dodge my Newf Yukon or do an eight-point turn in the kitchen, the bag will keep the liquid away from my precious geeky gadgets. One less thing for me to worry about!

    I also took the Shop Bag with me last week to the surgery center on the day of my procedure, to carry my change of clothes, water bottle for afterwards, and sunglasses for the drive home. As several other forum members have noted, most recently @vivelly when her daughter broke her leg horseback riding and @eWalker when her mother had to make an emergency trip, TB bags can help make a stressful experience much easier, and even pleasant. It’s one more reason why I love these bags.

    ~Nancy

  2. #2
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    that looks like no fun at all. hope you heal quickly. i have that same shop bag, and it is the best!!
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  3. #3
    Registered User monkeylady's Avatar
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    You have LOTS of my sympathy! What a drag! But, you are sooo resourceful. Kudos!
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    The stockpile keeps growing...I'm in serious trouble.

  4. #4
    Registered User flaneuse's Avatar
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    You poor thing! I can't even imagine! I agree with you re: the shop bag for organization. It really is the perfect size. And such a cheery color. Best wishes for a speedy recovery this time and for the future.

  5. #5
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    Feel better. I have a pair (small and large) of the nordic shopbags, too. Luv them.
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  6. #6
    Registered User vivelly's Avatar
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    Oh ncb4 that does not look like fun at all! I hope you will recover quickly.. Being off your legs must be so hard.. Tons of sympathy from here too.
    Thank God we have our Tom Bihn gear to make a difficult time much more easy... You take it easy, one point turn in the kitchen at a time and a speedy recovery x
    Oh.. And the shop bag looks awesome in you bike basket!

  7. #7
    Registered User ncb4's Avatar
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    Thanks so much to everyone for their kind wishes for my recovery: I appreciate them all more than I can say. @vivelly, I think of how quickly your daughter returned to the show ring with her horse after her injury. She is younger and stronger and far nimbler than I—I am an absolute disaster with crutches—but I can still try to emulate her courage and determination in staying as active as possible.
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  8. #8
    Registered User vivelly's Avatar
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    Ncb4 younger bones heal quicker.. She is herself not back on the horse yet... Still in the moonboot, but should be fine in another three weeks.. I still have to drive her to the lessons though so that she can be part of it even when she can't ride yet . Patience is so important when you are injured. Determination is good, but it's no good rushing things. Be gentle on yourself and take your time.. A fall can make things worse. One step at a time and before you know you are back up and running Xoxoxo

  9. #9
    Registered User ncb4's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vivelly View Post
    Ncb4 younger bones heal quicker.. She is herself not back on the horse yet... Still in the moonboot, but should be fine in another three weeks.. I still have to drive her to the lessons though so that she can be part of it even when she can't ride yet . Patience is so important when you are injured. Determination is good, but it's no good rushing things. Be gentle on yourself and take your time.. A fall can make things worse. One step at a time and before you know you are back up and running Xoxoxo
    Yes, younger bones do heal quicker. And I'm trying to be a "patient" patient, but it's hard. How long has your daughter had to be in the moonboot? I will be switched to that just before Christmas and have to wear it for about two months. But since I'll be able to walk with both legs once that happens, I'm actually looking forward to it.
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  10. #10
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    Best wishes on your recovery, ncb4! I am a bit more than two years out from a serious leg injury that left me non-weight-bearing for four months, and believe me, I fully understand how terrific a knee scooter can be. I'd have named mine, too, except it was just a rental. (And did I cry when it had to go back!) If you have a travel tray, that also makes a great place to corral things in the scooter basket. I also used mine when I transitioned to a walker and partial-weight-bearing--it was a smaller basket on that thing but still benefitted from having the organization of the travel tray.

    I wonder if the injured and disabled aren't a key market for a lot of Tom Bihn accessories. I've given away three travel trays now as gifts for hospitalized or bed-bound friends, and I can see the utility of the shop bag for this population, too. As the population ages, more and more of us will temporarily or permanently be in need of things like this to make our lives easier.

    Tom Bihn--it's not just for travel anymore!
    Western Flyer (crimsom) with Absolute strap, Zephyr (black), Medium Cafe Bag (steel/olive), Shop Bags (solar, steel), Large Cafe bag (navy/cayenne), Small café bag (forest), Tristars (steel/solar and indigo/solar),Aeronaut (steel), Side Effects (old skool black cordura, olive parapack), Imagos (steel, cork, wasabi, and aubergine, hemp, steel), Dyneema Western Flyer (Nordic/Steel) and miscellaneous packing cubes, pouches, etc.

  11. #11
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    One more thing, ncb4--leg injuries take a longer time to heal than you might guess, since you're working against gravity. Make sure you elevate your leg as much as you can, because swelling can cause permanent injury to the little valves in your veins that keep blood from pooling in your legs. I ended up needing to elevate my leg at least on occasion for more than a year after my injury. You might be interested in a website dedicated to discussions and information for those with broken legs, mybrokenleg.com. The FAQ and tips sections are a gold mine of information and ideas about how to get along while you're non-weight-bearing, and thereafter, which are helpful for anyone with a leg injury or surgery, not just BLers. For example, I wouldn't have thought to use barbeque tongs to help me grab things like books and clothing that I couldn't otherwise reach. Or that Palmers Cocoa Butter Oil is great to deal with the gnarly and dry skin you get after the bandages come off.

    On last thing--leg injuries are particularly debilitating, since they make it so hard to just get around, you start to go stir crazy. There's an interesting medical study that found that over a third of people with serious leg injuries suffer from depression during the recovery period, but it is underdiagnosed because orthopedic surgeons are not trained to ask about it. I can't say I suffered with diagnosable depression, but I did find myself much more prone to blue moods and annoyance, especially as the initial weeks of pain wore off but I was still trapped in the house unable to walk. Luckily, my surgeon did keep tabs on my moods as well as my bones, and gave me permission to express my frustration and unhappiness so that I didn't have to pretend always to be the perfect 'patient patient.' So recognize that this is a major life event, but that it will pass in time, and that there are no medals for getting through it with the fewest gripes. Good luck and a speedy recovery to you!
    ncb4, WenV, nsh and 3 others like this.
    Western Flyer (crimsom) with Absolute strap, Zephyr (black), Medium Cafe Bag (steel/olive), Shop Bags (solar, steel), Large Cafe bag (navy/cayenne), Small café bag (forest), Tristars (steel/solar and indigo/solar),Aeronaut (steel), Side Effects (old skool black cordura, olive parapack), Imagos (steel, cork, wasabi, and aubergine, hemp, steel), Dyneema Western Flyer (Nordic/Steel) and miscellaneous packing cubes, pouches, etc.

  12. #12
    Registered User ncb4's Avatar
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    @flitcraft, first of all, let me say how sorry I am that you've been dealing—and hopefully healing—for two years now after a serious leg injury. My heart goes out to you: and here I am, fussing because I have to be off my leg for a month!

    And thank you SO much for all your tips. I did do a lot of research prior to my surgery, trying to prepare myself as much as I could. Unfortunately, this is my fourth orthopedic surgery in just 37 months, so I did have some experience. But compared to this , even my neck fusion was a breeze. And I confess, with my prior surgeries I have not been an exemplary patient. I always push too fast to get back to full activity, but this time, I knew that would be dangerously stupid thing to do. I really do need to sit around with my "heel above my heart" as much as possible every day for the first four weeks.

    I wouldn't have thought about the possibility of depression if 1) I hadn't had the prior surgeries, and 2) my sister hadn't broken her leg a few years ago and told me how instantly and deeply depressed she got. So I'm trying to keep an eye out for any signs of that in myself, and to prevent it by staying as engaged as I can with other people, staying as active as I can mentally even I can't be active physically, doing some safe exercises in bed and a chair, and getting outside to sit in the sunshine and fresh air every day on the back porch. And I watch a lot of comedy to keep myself laughing. But thank you for sharing your experience with this, because it makes me feel like I'm not alone when I start to feel a little blue.

    And I do have a Travel Tray. I just bought it in August, but when i went looking for it last week, I couldn't find it anywhere. Aargh! Where is it hiding when I need it most?

    As for naming my knee scooter, I did that because I went ahead and bought one. The cost for renting it for one month was almost exactly the same as purchasing it outright, and insurance will allegedly reimburse me [if I decide to fill out the umpteen forms they require, which I may not]. This scooter is worth every cent I paid for it; I don't know how I could function without it as I don't have the dexterity or upper body strength for crutches. Besides, I knew I'd be needing the scooter again next year when I have the second surgery. So Rowdy it is!

    I'm off to check that website you told me about right now. Thanks so much for everything!

    ~Nancy

  13. #13
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    Nancy, so sorry you are laid up, but glad you can find some bright spots in helping you move about. Sending you positive healing vibes!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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  14. #14
    Registered User ncb4's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pokilani View Post
    Nancy, so sorry you are laid up, but glad you can find some bright spots in helping you move about. Sending you positive healing vibes!
    Thanks so much, Pokilani!

  15. #15
    Registered User adalangdon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ncb4 View Post
    @flitcraft, first of all, let me say how sorry I am that you've been dealing—and hopefully healing—for two years now after a serious leg injury. My heart goes out to you: and here I am, fussing because I have to be off my leg for a month!

    And thank you SO much for all your tips. I did do a lot of research prior to my surgery, trying to prepare myself as much as I could. Unfortunately, this is my fourth orthopedic surgery in just 37 months, so I did have some experience. But compared to this , even my neck fusion was a breeze. And I confess, with my prior surgeries I have not been an exemplary patient. I always push too fast to get back to full activity, but this time, I knew that would be dangerously stupid thing to do. I really do need to sit around with my "heel above my heart" as much as possible every day for the first four weeks.
    Take care, Nancy... my thoughts are with you. I really hope you'll get well soon. Seconding what @vivelly said-- please, please be patient as you heal. My mother is as active as she is injury-prone (neck, shoulder, hands) and/but hates waiting to get better... and as a result, has never mended well. A lot of her pains arise from her never having let previous injuries fully heal. (And I can't do anything but nag, because she's in a different country!)
    Last edited by adalangdon; 11-21-2014 at 05:54 PM.
    ncb4 likes this.
    Wishlist: Black (Cordura)/UV S25; Aubergine/Steel SE; new 200D & 400D Dyneema fabrics; Imago v. 2

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