View Poll Results: Luggage Locks

Voters
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  • Nah, wouldn't use one.

    36 42.86%
  • I would use one, but they don't work with my bag.

    18 21.43%
  • I always use a luggage lock and make sure to get bags that they work with.

    30 35.71%
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Thread: Poll: Luggage Locks

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moose View Post
    Sadly, I've been getting reports of thefts from bags in the overhead bins of airplanes.

    If forced to use the overhead I always try to use one a row ahead of me and on the opposite side. I can, or think I can, keep a better eye on it.
    Moose
    I also try to do the same, Moouse. It doesn't always work out that way, but it makes grabbing my bag easier when I'm getting off the plane when I can place my bag this way.

    Although, I end up sleeping on long haul flights - in which case I figure that if someone takes something from my bag while I'm asleep, they must need it more than I do!
    eWalker likes this.
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  2. #32
    Gee
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    Hi Darcy, Glad you asked this question and I voted for some sort of rudimentary locking facility just to enable a lock or cable tie to be put through the zip. I got my first TB bag yesterday, a WF and was surprised when there were no lock loops on the zips. While I don't expect to check bags in the TB size regularly, there are a few situations where locking is handy. Sometimes when traveling for work I am carrying mission critical items, so check my luggage and carry the items as hand luggage as I would prefer to throw my luggage and contents away than not arrive with the items. This is more relevant in Australia and Asia where often a 7kg limit is strictly enforced for hand luggage. Also when leaving luggage at a hotel reception or clients office I prefer to leave it locked. Finally, as already mentioned, for longer flights, which most are from Australia, it is nice to lock larger compartments while sleeping.

    The question should be - if you can get the same zips presently used but with the pulls with holes in them - why wouldn't you use them? They are no disadvantage to those who don't use the holes and very helpful to those who do.

    This also gives some protection (if you do have to check your bag) from baggage handlers using open bags to transport drugs. Locks are often used between Australia and Asia to combat this and there are services at the airport which literally glad-wrap your bag. I would imagine this is more likely with distinctive or brightly coloured bags.
    eWalker likes this.

  3. #33
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    Zippers should be lockable. While it may not provide protection from a motivated thief, it makes theft a bit less convenient.

    I've always liked the lockable zipper trains on my Eagle Creek luggage. Adds almost no weight but joins the zipper trains so the zippers can't be folded apart.
    eWalker likes this.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank II View Post
    I won't buy a bag unless there is a way to secure the zippers either with an official lock addition or at least with metal zipper pulls that have holes.
    Locking two zipper chains together by the pulls doesn't provide any real protection. The zippers can be easily folded an deprecated. Unless the trains lock together the zipper can just pulled open.
    eWalker likes this.

  5. #35
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    If checking I always use a lock.
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  6. #36
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    I use a zip tie. Often in a color so it's easier to see at claim. Chances of me losing a key; pretty decent. I'll zip tie everywhere I need on a bag just as much to keep it from opening during transit as much as security. If I'm carry-on I wouldn't lock or tie anyway because I'm in and out of the bag too much to hassle.

    Quote Originally Posted by blarson94 View Post
    My advice, if you check your bag, just use a zip tie and not a cable and/or lock. You are correct that they just cut them off, or they get caught in the belts and damage your bag. The plastic zip tie can be cut off easily by them and by you with a small (approved) finger nail clipper.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    eWalker likes this.
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  7. #37
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    Another split key ring fan here. I would never, ever carry a backpack on public transit (especially from an airport or train station!) without using one to 'lock' the zippers. I don't worry so much about my stuff in a hotel room, assuming there's a room safe.

    Yes, I know room safes aren't 'safe', but I'm traveling with bags that could be slashed open if anyone was determined to get it. So I'm willing to go low-tech.

    If I ever checked bags, though, I'd probably want a better locking solution...
    eWalker likes this.
    Western Flyer (crimsom) with Absolute strap, Zephyr (black), Medium Cafe Bag (steel/olive), Shop Bags (solar, steel), Large Cafe bag (navy/cayenne), Small café bag (forest), Tristars (steel/solar and indigo/solar),Aeronaut (steel), Side Effects (old skool black cordura, olive parapack), Imagos (steel, cork, wasabi, and aubergine, hemp, steel), Dyneema Western Flyer (Nordic/Steel) and miscellaneous packing cubes, pouches, etc.

  8. #38
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    I always prefer to lock luggage during transit (whenever possible), especially when checking it. While a lock only provides minimal security on soft-sided luggage, it tends to discourage opportunistic theft. While bags can be slashed (which makes the intent obvious), a more subtle form of theft can occur where zippers are popped open with something as simple as a ballpoint pen. That's less obvious as it could be argued that the zippers simply failed due to rough handling.

    It wouldn't be difficult or expensive for manufacturers of soft luggage to add a firmly attached stainless steel "D" ring at the centre point of zippers, which would allow zippers to be secured by a lock such as http://www.amazon.ca/Master-Lock-468.../dp/B000WO84Z2. Depending on the design of the bag, one "D" ring could be used to secure more than one zipper.
    eWalker likes this.

  9. #39
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    I use one when checking luggage for travel abroad, especially to Asia/South Asia, but annoyingly they often get cut off (I use TSA-approved locks).

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