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Tom Bihn Forums: Community discussion on travel bags, laptop bags, and backpacks. Tom Bihn has been designing and making bags since 1972. The best materials and innovative construction.

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  1. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darcy View Post
    I definitely wouldn't rule more Aeronaut-type travel bags out. Maybe later this year.
    Yeah! Something around 2000 cu in, yes? A mid-size bag like the Tri-Star.

    I have put in my order for a Tri-Star, and would love for it to be the bag for me, but I cannot help wonder about something more along the thought of a one-compartment bag, the "slender Aeronaut."

    I would get to use my growing collection of packing cubes and organizers, and also enjoy the most likely lower weight.

  2. #107
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    I've realized that by playing around with certain combinations, I can use many of my Eagle Creek packing cubes, sacs, etc. in the Tri-Star without having to buy new packing cubes....helps save a little money, for now.

  3. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by fbrown627 View Post
    I've realized that by playing around with certain combinations, I can use many of my Eagle Creek packing cubes, sacs, etc. in the Tri-Star without having to buy new packing cubes....helps save a little money, for now.
    Oh, good...I couldn't afford to get the TriStar packing cubes this time (my order including steel/solar TriStar was $360...yikes!) and I was hoping that I'd be able to use my existing Eagle Creek packing cubes for now. What combination did you find would work well, if you don't mind me asking?

  4. #109
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    I found I can put an EC 1/2 cube, Koala toiletry kit, tube cube and xsmall sac in the front section with a little room to spare.

    In the back, the EC double cube should fit nicely. So should the EC 18 packing folder. (Not both at the same time...only one.)

    (Sorry Tom Bihn people but the economy is tight and we have to cut back a little. )

  5. #110
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    On the zipper vs. cord pulls: Having the choice to use either is good. I would keep the zipper pulls on the main compartments so I could use a lock if necessary and put cord pulls on the side pockets myself.

  6. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by fbrown627 View Post
    I found the webpage.....still a work in progress.......just saw the first photo and sadly, it's a deal breaker for me...

    Cord pulls instead of metal zipper pulls...I'm really depressed.

    Useless if I can't put a lock on the main compartments.....

    Bummed out.....
    In my opinion a lock on the zippers is a waste of time. On the One Bag site Doug Dyment shows how easy it is to get into a "locked" bag (two thirds of the way down the page). To quote from the page:

    Luggage is inherently not very secure. The hard-shelled variety is somewhat more tamper-resistant than the soft-sided versions, though most of the integrated locks that you'll find are easily compromised. And although zipper sliders can be locked together (with a hasp-style slider such as pictured at right, or simply by passing a padlock through holes in the slider tabs), this will prevent casual pilferage only; it presents little deterrent to the knowledgeable miscreant.

    Such a locking mechanism, as it turns out, can easily be "spilled" — even with a hasp-style slider — as shown below: simply (1) grasp the fabric firmly on both sides of the locked zipper sliders, and (2) pull in opposing directions, perpendicular to the zipper track. It's then an easy matter to (3) reach into the bag and remove all but very large items. Positioning the sliders at a corner of the bag facilitates the initial separation step, and also permits a larger opening.
    and-

    With a coil zipper (the most common type), bag entry is simpler still: push the slider(s) all the way to one end, then press the point of a ballpoint pen firmly into the centre of the closed zipper track. This will separate the intertwining coils (without damaging them), making it trivial to open the bag fully by simply pulling the zipper track apart in both directions. Coil zippers are designed to self-heal easily, so can be restored to their original condition merely by pulling a slider backward (occasionally with a bit of help from you, holding the coils together), thus rejoining the halves. Both of these techniques, of course, are handy to know should you ever be stuck with a locked bag to which you have lost the key or combination, or that has become jammed or otherwise inoperable.
    I have tried both with my Aeronaut and he is correct. I just use "bread ties" to keep the zippers from coming loose in transit and keep an eye on my bag at all times.
    Last edited by GaryS; 04-30-2009 at 10:58 AM.

  7. #112
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    Except Gary, I only lock the zippers when on a crowded train and I need to go to the loo or want to get a cup of coffee and I don't want to drag my bag with me.

    So, I lock it to the overhead luggage rail and lock the zippers together. This will deter a thief. Let's face it, if someone goes to a bag with twist ties, opens them, and then the case, no one is going to take notice. However, someone forcing open the zippers might bring some notice from another passenger. It's a deterrent. A thief is looking for an easy target. Locks are just one more deterrent than adds time to their deeds.

    I, too, have opened bags using the methods you described. It's easy, But hard to do with others around.

    Even when leaving the bag, I still take my "valuables" with me in either a daybag or messenger bag.

    Any bag out of your sight is open for theft. And that's why I do my best to only carry on.

  8. #113
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    i think you're right - the presence of a lock deters the thief looking for a quick and easy target. i have to admit that i don't use locks on any of my bags - whether i check them in or hand carry them.

    let me share a couple of stories about bags, locks and safety that come to mind.

    first, a friend of mine who always packs way too much stuff does lock his bags. he was traveling with one of those huge 28" hard shell suitcases that have locks built into the latch. this design is from some time ago - before the TSA mandated that locks on bags must be TSA locks that they can open. you can still use a suitcase like my friend has - just don't lock it or you risk the lock being broken. it so happened that he was traveling with this suitcase and locked it. the TSA decided to open up his bag to check it and broke the lock. the bag arrived somewhat closed as it came around the baggage carousel at his destination.

    have you ever had the TSA open up your bags? it's happened to me when i travel with my wife and we check in a suitcase. you get this little card inside your bag telling you they opened up your bags. i think it's pretty creepy.


    second, a friend of mine who is a photographer was traveling through india by train. i've traveled on overnight trains in india before. i remember seeing that the guy traveling next to me chained his suitcase to he metal seat post. you'd need a serious bolt cutter to cut through this chain or a hack saw to cut through the seat post. his was a hard shell suitcase. there are concerns over theft and securing your luggage in this manner gives you one less thing to be concerned about while you sleep.

    anyway, getting back to my photographer friend - she was asleep in one of these overnight trains with her head resting on her bag. i think it seems quite reasonable that if your bag is under your head, you're going to know if anyone tries to take it or open it. right?

    unfortunately, someone got into her bag while she slept on top of it and absconded with a camera body and a couple of lenses!

    we have our share of problems here in the u.s. but it is amazing when you experience some of the things that happen in other parts of the world - you realize how much we take for granted.

    it's so unfortunate when we complain about what we don't have, rather than being thankful for all that we do have.

    i know - i'm going off on all sorts of tangents here.

    Quote Originally Posted by fbrown627 View Post
    Except Gary, I only lock the zippers when on a crowded train and I need to go to the loo or want to get a cup of coffee and I don't want to drag my bag with me.

    So, I lock it to the overhead luggage rail and lock the zippers together. This will deter a thief. Let's face it, if someone goes to a bag with twist ties, opens them, and then the case, no one is going to take notice. However, someone forcing open the zippers might bring some notice from another passenger. It's a deterrent. A thief is looking for an easy target. Locks are just one more deterrent than adds time to their deeds.

    I, too, have opened bags using the methods you described. It's easy, But hard to do with others around.

    Even when leaving the bag, I still take my "valuables" with me in either a daybag or messenger bag.

    Any bag out of your sight is open for theft. And that's why I do my best to only carry on.
    Last edited by maverick; 04-30-2009 at 11:49 AM.
    -m

  9. #114
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    Nope it isn't! I love the new color. Tristar is like a Western Flyer on STEROIDS!



    Quote Originally Posted by keb View Post
    Even though it is not an immediate need for me I just can't wait to see it!! Is that wrong??

  10. #115
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    Does anyone have an opinion whether the Tri-Star would be okay as a carryon for a regional jet (the really little ones, with only 3 seats across) or would one likely be asked to gate check it?

    I have a particular reason for asking this, as you may have guessed.

  11. #116
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    I'd be skeptical about whether the Tristar would work as a carryon on those dinky regional jets. I'm pretty sure it wouldn't fit in the mini overhead compartments, and I'm not too confident about under the seats, either. But I would be more than willing to try--worst case scenario is that you'd have t gate check it.
    Western Flyer (crimsom) with Absolute strap, Zephyr (black), Medium Cafe Bag (steel/olive), Shop Bags (solar, steel), Large Cafe bag (navy/cayenne), Small café bag (forest), Tristars (steel/solar and indigo/solar),Aeronaut (steel), Side Effects (old skool black cordura, olive parapack), Imagos (steel, cork, wasabi, and aubergine, hemp, steel), Dyneema Western Flyer (Nordic/Steel) and miscellaneous packing cubes, pouches, etc.

  12. #117
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    One more thing about the Tristar--the snap-closure on the bottle holder is nothing less than genius!! There are so many incredibly thoughtful touches on this bag. From my perspective, it is the ultimate bag--no question about it. And for those of you hoping for a cut down Aeronaut, I'm confident that when Tom gets around to designing it, you too will have the ultimate bag of your dreams.

    Can't wait to get ahold of this one, though.
    Western Flyer (crimsom) with Absolute strap, Zephyr (black), Medium Cafe Bag (steel/olive), Shop Bags (solar, steel), Large Cafe bag (navy/cayenne), Small café bag (forest), Tristars (steel/solar and indigo/solar),Aeronaut (steel), Side Effects (old skool black cordura, olive parapack), Imagos (steel, cork, wasabi, and aubergine, hemp, steel), Dyneema Western Flyer (Nordic/Steel) and miscellaneous packing cubes, pouches, etc.

  13. #118
    keb
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    Quote Originally Posted by flitcraft View Post
    I'd be skeptical about whether the Tristar would work as a carryon on those dinky regional jets. I'm pretty sure it wouldn't fit in the mini overhead compartments, and I'm not too confident about under the seats, either. But I would be more than willing to try--worst case scenario is that you'd have t gate check it.
    I would agree. My experience is that the Western Flyer fits just fine, which is what makes it so great. Anything bigger is likely hit or miss...
    Western Flyer (Crimson); 4Z Brain Cell; Swift (wife); Empire Builder (Black/Steel/Wasabi); Aeronaut (Black/Steel); Side Effect (Black), 3D Cube (Olive); lots of cubes/pouches/kit; Synapse (Navy/Solar); Smart Alec (Cardinal/Steel)

  14. #119
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    hi!

    i have carried the aeronaut onboard the small planes where you have one seat on one side and two on the other. i was able to place it nicely in the overhead compartment. i was actually going to take a picture when my wife told me to put the camera away . the aeronaut's dimensions are 22" x 14" x 9".

    the tri-star's dimensions are 19" x 13" x 8". so it should also easily fit in the overhead compartment of those small planes.

    Quote Originally Posted by MaggieScratch View Post
    Does anyone have an opinion whether the Tri-Star would be okay as a carryon for a regional jet (the really little ones, with only 3 seats across) or would one likely be asked to gate check it?

    I have a particular reason for asking this, as you may have guessed.

  15. #120
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    My one criticism of the Tristar might be that it's not entirely TSA approved for leaving your laptop in it's case....but you can probably just pop the brain cell out and leave everything else there.



    Quote Originally Posted by maverick View Post
    hi!

    i have carried the aeronaut onboard the small planes where you have one seat on one side and two on the other. i was able to place it nicely in the overhead compartment. i was actually going to take a picture when my wife told me to put the camera away . the aeronaut's dimensions are 22" x 14" x 9".

    the tri-star's dimensions are 19" x 13" x 8". so it should also easily fit in the overhead compartment of those small planes.

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