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Thread: How do you contribute to the bag community?

  1. #1
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    How do you contribute to the bag community?

    Friends,

    I have a dilemma:

    Whenever I get into a hobby I have the worst habit of going all the way.

    Example: I start to like watches and I automatically want to buy watch books and tools and start modifying and building my own watch.

    The same goes for bags. I love bags, and whenever I think about it long enough I have an itch to learn how to sew and make my own bags. Though I know this is only a fleeting desire, as this has been the case with many a hobby.

    So how do you get your fix for something like this? How do you contribute to the community/hobby of those who make bags?

    Hopefully this makes sense to you guys. It does in my head.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    I'm nearly the exact same, Pord. When I got into knives, I thought of taking metallurgy classes. I've done the same with bicycle maintenance, knife sharpening, soap making, and a few other things.

    Is there a cure for fascination? The real question is: would you want there to be? A little bit of mania can go a long way.

    Actually trying out sewing might be fun. Otherwise, I tend stick to reading, researching, and then sharing what I learn however I can.

    And with that said, I now have another bag coming to add fuel to the fire. It's a crazy ride, but a very fun one. You only live once, as they say.

    John

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    Quote Originally Posted by jwiegley View Post
    I'm nearly the exact same, Pord. When I got into knives, I thought of taking metallurgy classes. I've done the same with bicycle maintenance, knife sharpening, soap making, and a few other things.

    Is there a cure for fascination? The real question is: would you want there to be? A little bit of mania can go a long way.

    Actually trying out sewing might be fun. Otherwise, I tend stick to reading, researching, and then sharing what I learn however I can.

    And with that said, I now have another bag coming to add fuel to the fire. It's a crazy ride, but a very fun one. You only live once, as they say.

    John
    John,

    Wow, I loved knives for a season too. Though I was more obsessed with proper sharpening and what not. I have also had the same feeling for bicycle maintenance as well. I have never done the soap thing . . . though I have made my own natural health care products.

    . . . My only issue is that I don't know how to get over this as far as bags go. I love TB bags for sure and have a couple, but I feel as though this is not enough for me. Weirdest thing.

  4. #4
    Volunteer Moderator Badger's Avatar
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    This is an interesting problem to have. I imagine you have all sorts of arcane knowledge stored up, but can also understand how it can be frustrating to have momentary obsessions, especially if they end up costing you a lot of money (i.e., buying lots of watch-making tools in addition to loads of watches).

    I think that contributing to this forum might help you simultaneously indulge and manage your interest in bags. This is a pretty diverse crowd of people, and everyone has their "thing." Some people are into travel and packing, others into minimalism, and others into design. There are more but these are some examples. I am positive that there are other people here who would like to discuss, in technical detail, the construction of these products. Posing questions and/or trying to figure out together how various design elements work with sound fabrication could be very satisfying for you, especially if it gives you a way to direct your impulse to learn more. Ultimately, these discussions may encourage you to buy a sewing machine and experiment with your own designs, but you may find that the process of coming to knowledge, and then sharing that knowledge with others, can be as rewarding as doing the work of creating and constructing.




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    Quote Originally Posted by Badger View Post
    This is an interesting problem to have. I imagine you have all sorts of arcane knowledge stored up, but can also understand how it can be frustrating to have momentary obsessions, especially if they end up costing you a lot of money (i.e., buying lots of watch-making tools in addition to loads of watches).
    You hit it right on the head.

    Monetarily it can be and has been an issue. However, I think it has been more of an issue with the fact that I spend a whole lot of time and energy with one hobby for a while and then out of the blue it switches. However, some hobbies, such as bags, have always been on my interest radar. So I would just like to find a way in which I could perhaps make this hobby more permanent and meaningful. I want to do this with bags because not only do I enjoy them, but I think they are super practical (watches are no longer all that practical).

    I love the idea of minimalism, so it is interesting that you would touch on that. However, I am not sure how to merge bags and minimalism other than by not buying bags anymore.

  6. #6
    Volunteer Moderator Badger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pord View Post

    I love the idea of minimalism, so it is interesting that you would touch on that. However, I am not sure how to merge bags and minimalism other than by not buying bags anymore.
    Not buying anything is one school of minimalism, but I think a more sustainable and practical method is to abide by "buy well and carefully, and no more than you need." By this, a person may have, say, a few backpacks and travel bags, but each of them is used regularly and does its job. Consideration goes into every purchase (not just bags) and one tries to buy the best one can afford so the item won't break or wear before its time and need to be replaced. Finally, if an item is still functional but no longer useful for one's purposes, one can sell it or give it away so someone else can use and enjoy it.

    Such thinking carries over to travel as well. I think many people are conditioned to think that they must pack for every foreseeable incident, and that leads to bringing a lot of stuff. The idea that traveling with less (way less) can make the experience way more enjoyable and freeing is a concept that I think elides strongly with the tenets of the mindful minimalism I suggested above.

    If you read the forum, even casually, you will note stories by people who have bought TB bags both new and used, have been given bags by friends or relatives or other forum members, and who have had and loved their bags for years and years. One reason that these stories may not automatically resonate with the idea of minimalism is that there is, I think, an ethos of abundance that comes from having a personal connection to the product, the manufacturer, and the other product users. This is just speculation on my part.

    Personally, I do have a tendency to want everything made by TB, but this desire (okay, greediness) on my part is tempered by the sincere enjoyment I get out of the TB items I already own. I probably could buy all the bags if I saved enough, but when I am thinking rationally that really isn't my goal, whereas enjoying what I have (and enjoying my life more than or in spite of my material possessions) is more lasting. Of course, there's nothing wrong with collecting all the merchandise if you can afford it, have somewhere to store it, and derive pleasure from it. This isn't about anti-consumerism. I'm just trying to explain how, to my mind, minimalism isn't necessarily incompatible with a love of things.




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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Badger View Post
    Not buying anything is one school of minimalism, but I think a more sustainable and practical method is to abide by "buy well and carefully, and no more than you need." By this, a person may have, say, a few backpacks and travel bags, but each of them is used regularly and does its job. Consideration goes into every purchase (not just bags) and one tries to buy the best one can afford so the item won't break or wear before its time and need to be replaced. Finally, if an item is still functional but no longer useful for one's purposes, one can sell it or give it away so someone else can use and enjoy it.

    Such thinking carries over to travel as well. I think many people are conditioned to think that they must pack for every foreseeable incident, and that leads to bringing a lot of stuff. The idea that traveling with less (way less) can make the experience way more enjoyable and freeing is a concept that I think elides strongly with the tenets of the mindful minimalism I suggested above.

    If you read the forum, even casually, you will note stories by people who have bought TB bags both new and used, have been given bags by friends or relatives or other forum members, and who have had and loved their bags for years and years. One reason that these stories may not automatically resonate with the idea of minimalism is that there is, I think, an ethos of abundance that comes from having a personal connection to the product, the manufacturer, and the other product users. This is just speculation on my part.

    Personally, I do have a tendency to want everything made by TB, but this desire (okay, greediness) on my part is tempered by the sincere enjoyment I get out of the TB items I already own. I probably could buy all the bags if I saved enough, but when I am thinking rationally that really isn't my goal, whereas enjoying what I have (and enjoying my life more than or in spite of my material possessions) is more lasting. Of course, there's nothing wrong with collecting all the merchandise if you can afford it, have somewhere to store it, and derive pleasure from it. This isn't about anti-consumerism. I'm just trying to explain how, to my mind, minimalism isn't necessarily incompatible with a love of things.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Thank you for your comment. I think you make some good points.


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