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Thread: Aeronaut tie-down straps - a bit weak?

  1. #1
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    Aeronaut tie-down straps - a bit weak?

    Hey there folks...

    I just packed my Aeronaut for the first time, after having it for more than 6 months or so.

    I tried to use the tie-down straps inside kind of like I would compression straps - in order to pull down all the stuff piled in it.

    I guess this isn't necessary, since the bag has enough structure to keep everything nice and snug.

    However, I *did* notice that when I tried to winch down the straps on the pile of stuff, when I got beyond a certain amount of torque, they snapped open without a lot of pulling. I'm guessing this is because they're only supposed to be for low-lying piles of clothes, etc, and not a mound of clothes-in-packing-sacks situation like I had.

    Is this right? Or do you think those straps could be made a little more beefy so that you could just wrap everything up in them? I could imagine a situation where I couldn't fill the main compartment full enough and would like to tie everything down, but if those straps unsnap with such a small amount of tension on them, I'd be worried it wouldn't be that useful.

    Comments from Aeronaut-owners and Tom Bihn staff?

    - Tim

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    They are tie-down straps not compression straps. There is a difference.

    Compression straps are mostly found on the outside of bags to compress the bag down for easy carrying.

    Tie-down straps, like the ones found inside the Aeronaut, are meant to hold things in place without shifting. They are not meant to compress clothes. They are also not meant to be pulled with all your might. It's not necessary.

    I have two Aeronauts and have used the tie down straps without problems. I pull them snug enough to help keep things in place. It doesn't take much effort. (And I use them with packing cubes that can fill the entire compartment. )

    I recently found my first convertible bag in storage (not from Tom Bihn.) Circa 1988. Its tie down straps were exactly that--two straps you had to tie. No connectors.
    Editor--One Bag, One World: News, Reviews & Community for Light Travelers. http://www.1bag1world.com

    Aeronaut(2), Tri-Star(2) Cadet , Large Cafe Bag, Travel Tray, Travel Money Belt, Absolute Straps(3), Side Effect, Clear Quarter Packing Cubes (2), 3D Organizer Cubes (4), Aeronaut & Tri-Star Packing Cubes, Clear Organizer Wallet, numerous Organizer Pouches,, Guardian Dual Function Light, Vertical Netbook Cache, Nexus 7 Cache, RFID Passport Pouch, numerous Key Straps.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank II View Post
    They are tie-down straps not compression straps. There is a difference.

    Compression straps are mostly found on the outside of bags to compress the bag down for easy carrying.

    Tie-down straps, like the ones found inside the Aeronaut, are meant to hold things in place without shifting. They are not meant to compress clothes. They are also not meant to be pulled with all your might. It's not necessary.

    I have two Aeronauts and have used the tie down straps without problems. I pull them snug enough to help keep things in place. It doesn't take much effort. (And I use them with packing cubes that can fill the entire compartment. )

    I recently found my first convertible bag in storage (not from Tom Bihn.) Circa 1988. Its tie down straps were exactly that--two straps you had to tie. No connectors.
    Thanks for the info, Frank!

    Hmm - perhaps it's because I packed this bag to near-bulging (but not quite), the straps didn't seem to have much use in that case.

    As for internal straps not usually being compression straps... I have a Lowe backpack from long ago (full-sized internal frame backcountry style, but I use it for my main travel bag when on long journeys), and it has internal compression straps in the sleeping back compartment. I find that's pretty useful, as once I put the sleeping bag in there and tighten the internal compression straps, it makes room for a few more items (usually clothing) that can fit around the borders of that compartment.

    I was hoping the internal straps in the Aeronaut could be used the same way, but I guess not.

    - Tim

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    Quote Originally Posted by tbessie View Post
    Hey there folks...

    I just packed my Aeronaut for the first time, after having it for more than 6 months or so.

    - Tim
    Sorry ... I just can't get past this ...... 6 months .... packed for the first time .... ...
    List under construction ....

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    JLE
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    Quote Originally Posted by daisy View Post
    Sorry ... I just can't get past this ...... 6 months .... packed for the first time .... ...
    I guess not everyone afflicted with TBAS suffers from the more serious, and probably incurable, P2JF2 variant ("Practice Packing Just For Fun"), Daisy!
    dorayme likes this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank II View Post
    They are tie-down straps not compression straps. There is a difference.

    Compression straps are mostly found on the outside of bags to compress the bag down for easy carrying.

    Tie-down straps, like the ones found inside the Aeronaut, are meant to hold things in place without shifting. They are not meant to compress clothes. They are also not meant to be pulled with all your might. It's not necessary.

    I have two Aeronauts and have used the tie down straps without problems. I pull them snug enough to help keep things in place. It doesn't take much effort. (And I use them with packing cubes that can fill the entire compartment. )

    I also use them to keep Packing Cubes in place, I just slide the tie-down straps closing mechanism which provides the most slack, place the straps on top of the Aeronaut each side, place the carefully packed Packing Cubes inside the Aeronaut, place the straps on top of the the Packing Cubes, slide the strap in the cinching position.

    I admit I was taken aback when I first saw the straps, they were not the beefy straps of my Brain Bag but looked more like ribbons and my first thought was: "Tom? Whatever"

    With Travel Dyneema bags, I am aiming for lightweight travel, the tie-down straps being very very lightweight and very strong (they are no satin ribbons) help tremendously with that. They turn an Aeronaute into a versatile compartmented bag with the help of the plethora of Packing Cubes available,



    .

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    Quote Originally Posted by daisy View Post
    Sorry ... I just can't get past this ...... 6 months .... packed for the first time .... ...
    Heh. :-)

    I just hadn't gone on that kind of trip since I bought it - the "more than a weekend trip where I need to bring more than a few items, but not everything I'd need for a monthlong sojourn" kind of trip. This was the first one I went on since I bought it.

    And yeah, I don't usually pack just for fun. :-)

    - Tim

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    Quote Originally Posted by backpack View Post
    I also use them to keep Packing Cubes in place, I just slide the tie-down straps closing mechanism which provides the most slack, place the straps on top of the Aeronaut each side, place the carefully packed Packing Cubes inside the Aeronaut, place the straps on top of the the Packing Cubes, slide the strap in the cinching position.
    Yeah, that's just what I tried. But the amount of torque needed to "keep in place" the packing cubes in the main compartment also happened to be the amount of torque needed to make them disconnect. I wasn't pulling them insanely hard, but with the cubes piled above the level of the top of the bag opening, I was hoping to "push" down some of the packing cubes with the straps. Even getting them snug when there were that many in the main compartment was not possible without the snaps giving way. :-(

    - Tim

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    Quote Originally Posted by tbessie View Post
    I wasn't pulling them insanely hard, but with the cubes piled above the level of the top of the bag opening, I was hoping to "push" down some of the packing cubes with the straps. Even getting them snug when there were that many in the main compartment was not possible without the snaps giving way. :-(

    - Tim
    So basically, you're overpacking and hoping the tie down straps would act like compression straps.

    Here's a thought.....pack less.
    Editor--One Bag, One World: News, Reviews & Community for Light Travelers. http://www.1bag1world.com

    Aeronaut(2), Tri-Star(2) Cadet , Large Cafe Bag, Travel Tray, Travel Money Belt, Absolute Straps(3), Side Effect, Clear Quarter Packing Cubes (2), 3D Organizer Cubes (4), Aeronaut & Tri-Star Packing Cubes, Clear Organizer Wallet, numerous Organizer Pouches,, Guardian Dual Function Light, Vertical Netbook Cache, Nexus 7 Cache, RFID Passport Pouch, numerous Key Straps.

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    Tim, since this is your first packing of the Aeronaut, would you mind sharing your packing list?

    We can help you streamline it.

    It is always a bit tricky to move from conventional airline fee happy packing to Tom Bihn light packing and, in my case and people who fly airlines with weight restriction, ultra light packing.

    I have noticed that ultra light packing is here to stay because at the beginning of the year, I had to scour the internet for analogue luggage scales with little result and ended up buying a fishing scale.
    But, now, a quick search for luggage scale shows plenty of pictures of models similar to my analogue fishing scale with the label luggage scale on them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tbessie View Post
    Yeah, that's just what I tried. But the amount of torque needed to "keep in place" the packing cubes in the main compartment also happened to be the amount of torque needed to make them disconnect. I wasn't pulling them insanely hard, but with the cubes piled above the level of the top of the bag opening, I was hoping to "push" down some of the packing cubes with the straps. Even getting them snug when there were that many in the main compartment was not possible without the snaps giving way. :-(
    I noticed the tie down straps had a maximum tension limit a couple weeks back as well when I took my new Aeronaut for her maiden flight. Of course my thinking was initially like yours to really crank down, but in truth, you don't need all that much tension to hold packing cubes in place. The main goal is to ensure they don't slide around, and to keep the weight tight to the bottom of the bag (against your back if worn as a backpack). Here's the test to see how much tension it really takesut your packing cubes in the bag, connect straps, tighten moderately but do not close the bag. Pick the bag up and jostle it about. Even with just moderate tension, the cubes didn't really go anywhere on me, so I figured that was enough and it was by design.

    I have on other pieces of luggage, really tried to crank the compression straps tight, and as a result, completely broken the straps/buckles. After realizing the design in the Aeronaut (and presumably other TB bags after looking at pictures/video), this seems purposeful and makes sense. Part of the overall issue if these were real compression straps is that if you kept pulling and pulling, you would cause the back of the bag to bow out, as the straps coupled with the soft sides of the back would effectively try to make a sausage. That would be pretty uncomfortable in backpack mode. I've noticed that first hand in the Timbuk2 Wingman, which is very similar in the overall design concept as the Aeronaut. You could pull the compression straps tight enough that you can no longer close the laptop compartment because the straps were pulling the sides of the back up, and if you were smart enough to put your laptop in first, it's now really jabbing into your back.

    As others have said, perhaps you need to also review your packing list. I packed for nearly a week (office and casual clothes) in basically one large packing cube, the top flap pocket (socks, undies), and both end pockets (shoes, gym clothes, and hotel slippers in one, toiletries in the other). Plenty of leftover room. On the return trip I even put my work laptop, and a lot of my purchases into the extra area. On a roadtrip with the bag, I fit about 4-5 days of clothes and shoes for both my wife and I in the Aeronaut with room to spare, and she was not at all trying to pack light (had more like 7 days of outfits to my 3-4).
    Own: Aeronaut (Navy/Iberian), Co-Pilot (Black/Iberian), Aeronaut Packing Cube Backpack (Wasabi), Travel Tray (Iberian), organizer wallet (Wasabi), passport pouch (Iberian), various cubes, pouches, sacks, and straps
    Want: Synapse or Smart Alec


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