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Thread: Packing a light jacket...

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    Question Packing a light jacket...

    Hey all, what accessory would you recommend for packing a light jacket into a space saving compact size that is easily usable in a variety of TB bags, form the larger bags like the BB and S25 down to the mid sized ones like the ID messenger bag?

    Seems to be a couple different "packing cube" style TB accessories that could do the job, just not sure of the best one. It has to for sure fit in an ID and Synapse 25, but like I said i'd like it as small as feasible so that it could potentially fit in a variety of TB bags in the future.

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    What is the jacket made of?

    A light nylon shell is more packable than a cotton, heavier 2 layer microfiber or linen jacket.

    If the jacket is structured like a sport's coat, it is even trickier to pack.


    I know that for the larger bags, the Packing Cube Backpack for Aeronaute is ideal. I managed to fold a light wool sport jacket size medium or a non wool fabric dressy woman jacket in plus size in there.


    I don't know how big the ID is, is it more like the Western Flyer or the Tristar?

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    Unfortunately my ID is on backorder until Aug so I haven't actually seen it or how much room is in it yet, but it would be closer to a Western Flyer than a Tri-Star. TB Lists it as a 20.9 liter bag, so like I said i'd need a packing cube size that is small as I can possibly get away with

    The jacket is light, basically just a step up from a wind breaker really. I can manually cram it into a pretty small space.

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    One of the travel stuff sacks may be the way to go. My raincoat and down jacket stuff in their own pocke but I have also used a small stuff sack. (Not a TB but one I already have)

    Sue
    Last edited by Canonsue; 06-12-2013 at 03:56 AM.
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    Registered User bltkmt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canonsue View Post
    My raincoat and down jacket stuff in their own pocket
    Can you share what brands these are? I am looking for a raincoat that does this.
    --------------------------------

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    Registered User Rocks's Avatar
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    Stuff sack sounds like it'll do!

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    Quote Originally Posted by bltkmt View Post
    Can you share what brands these are? I am looking for a raincoat that does this.
    If you're ok with some "technical" looking as opposed to a traditional trench coat or similarly-dressy garment, a bunch of outdoor/camping/technical companies make raincoats of all sorts that do it. One such example from LL Bean is the Trail Model Rain Jacket They have other styles that do it as well, including a 3/4 length coat. Patagonia, REI, North Face and others all have at least one jacket that pack into one of their own pockets. Pullovers, jackets, true waterproof, less waterproof but highly breathable, etc. are all options.
    Last edited by autolycus; 06-12-2013 at 12:44 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by autolycus View Post
    If you're ok with some "technical" looking as opposed to a traditional trench coat or similarly-dressy garmet, a bunch of outdoor/camping/technical companies make raincoats of all sorts that do it. One such example from LL Bean is the Trail Model Rain Jacket They have other styles that do it as well, including a 3/4 length coat. Patagonia, REI, North Face and others all have at least one jacket that pack into one of their own pockets. Pullovers, jackets, true waterproof, less waterproof but highly breathable, etc. are all options.
    That is really cool and a great tip!

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    I went down to my local REI and just tried on all of the rain jackets. I purchased a Pantagonia torrentshell on sale. However my lightweight down jacket can also zip in its pocket. Both of these jackets weigh almost nothing and are able to pack without taking much room. Wearing both jackets, I can be comfortable in very cold weather. I can go on week-long trips with packing everything in just my Synapse 19. I have a co-pilot if I need to take just a bit more stuff than what the Synapse 19 can handle.

    Sue
    Synapse 19, Co-pilot, Travel Tray, PCSB, Western Flyer, all in Dyneema, Side Effect and pouchmania

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    To answer the OP's question, assuming someone already owns a jacket, I would recommend one of the stuff sacks sized to fit it as tightly as possible or maybe the clear quarter packing cube. I have traveled with a raincoat folded up on one side of the CQPC and a lightweight wool sweater on the other. It fits neatly in a co-pilot, synapse, etc. and makes for easy transfer if I need to change bags for the day. That way I have an extra layer for warmth and a layer for rain all in one package.

    Quote Originally Posted by Canonsue View Post
    I went down to my local REI and just tried on all of the rain jackets. I purchased a Pantagonia torrentshell on sale. However my lightweight down jacket can also zip in its pocket. Both of these jackets weigh almost nothing and are able to pack without taking much room. Wearing both jackets, I can be comfortable in very cold weather. I can go on week-long trips with packing everything in just my Synapse 19. I have a co-pilot if I need to take just a bit more stuff than what the Synapse 19 can handle.

    Sue
    The Torrentshell is also my current rain jacket, and I also bought it on sale, but from direct from Patagonia. It is a fairly priced but not inexpensive jacket. A purchasing tip for those not needing a new jacket TODAY: Patagonia cycles through colors at least yearly, if not 2x yearly with seasonal colors for a lot of their garments. That means good sales on colors that are being phased out. You can usually find them on the Patagonia site's "Web Specials" page, or by email through their mailing list, or at outdoor stores like REI, Moosejaw, etc. This is especially true if you're a little flexible on color, as the blacks, grays, etc. tend to be around all the time and are therefore not sold at as big a discount--and sell out very quickly when they are marked down at all.

    I got a really great deal on a nano puff pullover last fall, and it is an amazing jacket that weighs almost nothing but can make me sweat even with just jeans, a long-sleeve t-shirt underneath, a moderately-paced dog walk, and 40deg temps. And it packs up into its own chest pocket even smaller than my torrentshell jacket, which is saying a LOT.
    Last edited by autolycus; 06-13-2013 at 08:03 AM.

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    Like Canonsue, I usually pack a Marmot Aegis jacket (light, but not super-light, rain shell) that works great on it's own, or over an insulating layer. Depending on the expected weather, I layer it with a light sweater, a heavy cardigan, the Marmot Zeus (light-weight down jacket), of a Marmot synthetic puffer. The Zeus and Aegis are ridiculously warm, weight very little, and pack down to an almost unnoticeable size. There's no need for me to carry a heavy coat any more when I travel.

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    I just want to hop in and mention Patagonia's excellent lifetime guarantee, which is basically this: if the garment ever fails to perform to your standards at any point, they'll replace it. If there's damage (that you caused), they can try to fix it for a small fee. I returned a rain jacket for repair since the interior was de-laminating from the outer shell and the zipper had gone all wonky. They couldn't fix it so they sent me a gift card equal to the price of the jacket (along with an explanation that this sort of interior wear and tear was normal, but the zipper bothered them enough that they wanted to replace the jacket). I had owned this shell for around twelve years, so I was impressed that they did this for me.

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    Registered User Lani's Avatar
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    This is a great thread to talk about layering. I've discovered that there are some pretty good outer garments designed for working out... They are often very thin but windproof or rainproof... so if you layer yourself with merino wool and whatnot underneath, you can really expand your wardrobe options without having to pack a whole lot more.

    For example, it was drab and cool this morning (and raining) so I wore my long-sleeved Smartwool base layer shirt, then a zip-up mid-layer (with hoodie) and a thin rainproof jacket on the outside. All three items are easily packable as well.
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    My Patagonia and Beyond Clothing Level V softshells both pack into the packing cube shoulder bag with room to spare and fit nicely in the size 3 travel stuff sack. I find the stuff sack approach to be problematic for packing flat, though, so I almost always choose the shoulder packing cube.

    BTW, the Patagonia may have saved my life once. A sudden cold front rolled in at Coachella Music Festival, and I spent 8 hours outdoors in the cold wind with just a t-shirt on underneath, long pants, and a boonie hat. The wind was so strong that it was blowing water out of the fountain they had in the VIP section up to ten feet away! I had to use every technical feature of the jacket to trap in heat, including zipping up all the zippers, and strapping down the wrists, stowaway hood, and waist. Other people got deathly ill by the next day, but I walked out of that three-day weekend in the swirling dust without so much as a sniffle.

    The Beyond jacket has also served me well--I was out in the Southern Calif. desert mountains without shelter till midnight in the lukewarm rain, and I felt fine the whole time with just a t-shirt underneath. I was soaked, but both jackets utilize water-repellent, breathable, quick-drying Glacier(TM) fabric, so I was never uncomfortable.

    Before you buy these jackets, it is important to note that they are NOT waterproof. They subscribe to the design philosophy that being breathable and quick-drying makes you more comfortable than if you wore a hardshell that traps sweat/humidity inside. You WILL get wet if you're out in the rain for more than fifteen minutes, but you won't feel sticky or annoyed about it. I recall seeing a US Army document saying that if you will be standing still in the rain, not working up a sweat, use a hardshell, but if you'll be moving about, use a softshell. With the softshell, your body heat will actually steam off the water that's soaked into the jacket.
    Last edited by dchang0; 07-05-2013 at 02:49 AM.

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    Sorry, but it's too difficult to make a recommendation for packing a jacket without actually seeing it.

    What you described (thin like a windbreaker) sounds like it could be packed into a space the size of a fist. Or 2 fists. Or much bigger.

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