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Thread: Packing a light jacket...

  1. #16
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    I agree, we need to see the jacket or have the brand or know if it is a wind breaker or a light jacket.

    It makes a tremendous difference.

    A wind breaker and some ultra light jackets can fold into themselves but some light jackets have lining and stronger waterproof fabric and will resist being folded unto themselves.

    And there are the jackets that are called "sport jackets" which are usually navy or loden, made for the navy or gentlemen farmer look or they are the ones used to become the top of pants suits.


    The last two have Joan Crawford sized shoulder pads and are as inflexible as her as well as her characters were.


    Every one of them can be packet in a Packing Cube Backpack for Aeronaut or Tristar/Western Flyer using the "how to fold a jacket technique" that can be found on Tom Bihn videos.

    But you could get away with a Travel Stuff Sack for the lightest ones, hence the need to see or know what kind of jacket it is.

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by dchang0 View Post
    My Patagonia and Beyond Clothing Level V softshells both pack into the packing cube shoulder bag with room to spare and fit nicely in the size 3 travel stuff sack. I find the stuff sack approach to be problematic for packing flat, though, so I almost always choose the shoulder packing cube.
    Which Patagonia and Beyond Clothing soft shells did you use and where did you purchase it? Thanks.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisc983 View Post
    Which Patagonia and Beyond Clothing soft shells did you use and where did you purchase it? Thanks.
    The Patagonia Level 5 jacket I have is no longer made, but Beyond makes the same thing (according to military contract) called the Glacier Shock Jacket. You can buy it (in non-military colors too) direct from Beyond at Beyond Clothing.

    It's not a "paclite" jacket in that it doesn't roll up into the size of fist, but it does pack very compactly. I usually put it in the flat "pocket" in the back of my Tri-Star where the backpack straps stow away or in the back pocket of my Large Cafe Bag. I've gone with thinner paclite jackets but found those to not trap enough body heat when in the cold. The Glacier Shock Jacket is the perfect "jack of all trades, master of none" that is what a light jacket for emergencies should be. Looks just good enough to wear in the office but tough enough for hiking, works well in the rain but not a downpour, thin enough for the desert afternoon heat but traps enough body heat for the cold desert night.
    Last edited by dchang0; 07-11-2013 at 01:01 AM.

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