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  1. #1
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    Will the Tri-Star fit my size 12 men's shoes?

    I'm looking at the Tri-Star, what a beautiful bag. I think it could work for me, but whatever bag I get, I need to be able to pack a pair of size 12 men's running shoes. Will these fit in the Tri-Star? I read somewhere that size 10 is about as big as you can fit, not sure if that's accurate or not.

  2. #2
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    I can get size 13 Keens in mine as well as 13 dress shoes so I think you will be fine.
    I am usually wearing my running shoes/Hiking shoes.
    Normally I stick them in the small side of the divided front pocket where the hieght may be the issue but they can always go in horizontal somewhere and then Bigfoots shoes could fit,not that I have seen him wearing any.

    Ed

  3. #3
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    Ed, thank you.

    I have a pair of old Timberland sandals that I usually take in case I want to make a quick run down to the pool or down the hall for ice, or to the lobby for a cup of coffee and don't want to lace up shoes. But I'm looking at a pair of Keen's to replace them (my Timberlands have gotten modest use but are about 15 years old and show it). And I'm thinking wearing the Keen's through security would make taking shoes on and off easier, though I don't relish the thought of going through security barefooted.

    How do you like yours?

    And what I'd probably stick in there would be either the Keen's or the running shoes (whichever I'm not wearing for the trip) along with a pair of Vibram FiveFingers (which don't take up much space).

  4. #4
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    I LOVE my Keens enough that I bought a second pair so I can have one in my Trailer all the time too.
    They are the most comfortable and sure footed shoe I think I have ever had? They are constructed amazingly well and I have had one pair for alpost 10 years and they are still almost like new.
    I am talking about the Sandal style Keen only.

    KEEN Footwear - Mobile

    I also bought a pair of their hiking shoe and they are so painful on my heel I can not wear them.
    It is a strange thing too?

    Anyway the ones I carry are also not very small and are fairly rigid as well. Somehow it looks like the pocket on the Tri Star won't zip shut around them but it always does.

    A huge pair of Teva's are no problem as well. I have also slid the Teva's into the back pocket where the backpack straps store with no problem.

    I have also tried to get my Diadora MTB shoes(with cleats) in there and those will not fit but they are also stiff like wood and are of course designed to be that way.

    The Tri Star amazes me everytime I pack it for a trip!

    Ed

  5. #5
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    Thanks. Yes, I'm looking at a pair of Keen sandals. They look really nice. Going to see if my local REI has any in stock so I can try them on. I have really narrow feet (12/B) and some stuff fits, most doesn't. Don't want my foot 'swimming' around in the shoe.

  6. #6
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    Same here exactly!
    Long and Narrow,foot.

    I think I got my 1st pair at REI too.
    I didn't believe the hype even though many friends would swear by them until I slipped a pair on in the store.
    It will not take long to decide.
    I also really like the Teva and had Timberlands before those but the Keen is just a much more "Shoelike" sandal to me.They are the first I have been able to wear while doing work outside if I need to.

  7. #7
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    Terrific, great to hear they fit your feet! Gives me hope.

  8. #8
    Registered User Lani's Avatar
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    Keen makes GREAT footwear. And if you like wearing those webbed sandals, Keen makes the best ones because they put huge "bumper guards" by your toes. A lot of other sandals are open-toed and you can stub your toes or easily pick up pebbles from the front opening.

    When you go read the footwear tips page of Rick Steves' web site (on his community Graffiti Wall), a lot of people also recommend Keens.

    I still have some Keens in my closet. The only reason I don't wear them now is because I wear MBTs to keep my heel spur at bay.
    Lani Teshima: A Dyneema diva with a closetful of Tom Bihn products!
    Publisher, The Travelite FAQ: Don't get saddled with baggage—free yourself & your mind by packing lightly!
    Editor, MousePlanet: Detailed park guides, daily news & stories from all over the Disney kingdom | Technical writer | Marathoner

  9. #9
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    Lani.....thanks for that Keen endorsement.

    Re your heal spur, I'd like to offer a suggestion. I'm the clinic director of The Egoscue Clinic in Austin, TX. We practice The Egoscue Method, which is basically using corrective exericses to bring a body back to postural balance, alleviating pain. Heel spurs happen when the body has lost postural balance and gait becomes compromised. It's a friction response, much like a callous or a blister. Bone spurs happen when the foot no longer strikes the ground as it was intended to do, thus causing excessive friction. The body responds to that friction with a protective mechanism, laying down calcium deposits to try to protect the impacted structure, and spurs begin to form.

    A great way to start working on some of this stuff on your own is with Pete Egoscue's book "Pain Free". I've lost track of how many people have told me it was of immense benefit to them. The MBTs are cool shoes, but they aren't addressing the core reason why you have the spurs in the first place. This book will help you figure out WHY you have the spurs. My suggestion would be to read the first three chapters, then start doing the exercises to promote functional loading of the foot during gait. If you have any questions about the book, I would be more than happy to assist you directly and answer your questions by phone or email, my complements.

    Sorry to take the thread off topic, and if my post here is of no interest, please feel free to just ignore it. It's not my intention to intrude, just offering some help.

  10. #10
    Registered User Lani's Avatar
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    Wow... thank you so much for your advice, conejo23! I'll pick up the book.

    For what it's worth, I think the whole ruckus started with plantar fasciitis on my right foot; I'd had it off and on for years and years and years. And then I went through a spate of weight loss and a ton of fitness... including jogging, which I've really liked in the past. But I developed such painful heels (esp on my right) that about 6 years ago, after finishing the San Francisco half-marathon then sitting on the shuttle bus to get back to the finish line for the full marathon (we did the route #1, which started at the same starting area but finished at 13.1-marker), and I was horrified to discover that my feet were totally frozen in pain and I could barely even walk, they were so bad.

    I went to a podiatrist and tried to do a bunch of exercises and I finally gave up and let him give me a cortisone shot. I don't know why I waited so long, because the relief was almost immediate.

    I've been pretty ginger since then. When I wear regular running shoes for any great length, I could feel the pain coming on.

    All that's contributed to my becoming more sedentary, and gaining my weight back... and so now I have back problems (which I know comes from not keeping my core in shape)... and MBTs help a great deal with that.

    BUT.... I will read the book! It will be great not to have to deal with foot pain! THANK YOU!!!
    Lani Teshima: A Dyneema diva with a closetful of Tom Bihn products!
    Publisher, The Travelite FAQ: Don't get saddled with baggage—free yourself & your mind by packing lightly!
    Editor, MousePlanet: Detailed park guides, daily news & stories from all over the Disney kingdom | Technical writer | Marathoner

  11. #11
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    Lani.....you're most welcome.

    the plantar fascitis happens for the exact same reason, compromised foot strike. With a normal level of demand, you may have just experienced that compromise as feet that were sore at the end of the day. But as a runner, your margin for postural error was much less. The more demand we present to our bodies, the more postural compromise's impact on joint function becomes amplified.

    You'll dig the book. In the meantime, here's a short video from our VP of Therapy Protocol talking about the linkages between postural integrity, running, and doing so pain free. It's focused on back pain, but the principles apply to any kind of pain. Enjoy.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by conejo23 View Post
    Lani.....you're most welcome.

    the plantar fascitis happens for the exact same reason, compromised foot strike. With a normal level of demand, you may have just experienced that compromise as feet that were sore at the end of the day. But as a runner, your margin for postural error was much less. The more demand we present to our bodies, the more postural compromise's impact on joint function becomes amplified.

    You'll dig the book. In the meantime, here's a short video from our VP of Therapy Protocol talking about the linkages between postural integrity, running, and doing so pain free. It's focused on back pain, but the principles apply to any kind of pain. Enjoy.
    thanks for sharing your wisdom. Video clips were great. I think I'll pick up the book as well.

  13. #13
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    You're most welcome.

    I'm not trying to hijack my own thread here, and I'm certainly not trying to solicit business. Just hate to see people hurting when there's usually a pretty simple fix available. If anyone has any questions about their own situation, feel free to email me (i'll go see if my email is in my profile). I'm happy to help in any way I can.

  14. #14
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    Good info, so thanks for veering off in the direction of feet! Plantar fascitis is my one big problem when I travel. It first started on a long trip when I was walking more than 5 miles a day; suddenly one morning I could barely walk. Not a great situation when you're supposed to be running around Europe. I now try to integrate more - and more vigorous - walking into my daily routine before a trip, but there's no guaranty that will prevent the PF from emerging again. I'll check out the video and book - surely there's more I can learn on the topic.

    Oh, and I like Keens too, but I wouldn't expect them to be ideal for narrow feet. They're fat little buggers!

  15. #15
    Registered User Lani's Avatar
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    Out of curiosity, do you still think it's OK for people with a perfectly healthy gait to wear rocker bottom heels like MBTs? I really like the way they feel.

    PS: I bought the book and it's in the mail from Amazon now. I'll go watch the videos as well. Thanks for the link.
    Lani Teshima: A Dyneema diva with a closetful of Tom Bihn products!
    Publisher, The Travelite FAQ: Don't get saddled with baggage—free yourself & your mind by packing lightly!
    Editor, MousePlanet: Detailed park guides, daily news & stories from all over the Disney kingdom | Technical writer | Marathoner

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