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  1. #1
    Registered User gonty's Avatar
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    Cork pouch for iPhone

    Last weekend I did a short overnight bike ride to Warburton. I needed handy access to my iPhone while it tracked my ride (via Runkeeper) and was used for the occasional photo.

    I had it in a small cork pouch tucked inside my saddlebag which was not very accessible. Then I looked at the straps holding my load on the front and the handy little clip on the pouch. A match made in heaven. Or Seattle?

    Name:  Warburton S24O Jan 2011-0.jpg
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    Jonathan
    Melbourne, Aus

    PS. a few more pics of the ride here.

  2. #2
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    This is really cool; how did you connect it to the strap? did you use the key strap? or something else? Also: I am assuming there was some "play" in the pouch---did it not hurt the phone? did you have the phone in another case inside?
    the trip itself seems lovely....and I loved your bike---not least cos it has upright handlebars, hard to find here in the US. And I loved your bag on the back!!! Who makes that?
    shiva

  3. #3
    Registered User gonty's Avatar
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    I just used the plastic snap hook on the pouch to clip on to the strap that is holding my tent etc on the bike.

    You're right about the play, it is just hanging there. But the trail was fairly smooth and I was taking it quite easy. It swung around slightly but wasn't actually hitting anything, so I was quite comfortable with that.

    I would like to come up with a solution that sees some sort of pouch strapped firmly on top of the gear I have strapped there.

    Thanks for the compliments on the bike. For the record, the bars actually came from the US. They are called Oxford bars and are made by Soma Fabrications. You could also get a range of similar bars from Rivendell or Velo Orange, both of whom I shopped from to build this bike.

    The saddlebag is a Camper longflap made by Carradice in the UK. There are a range of different sized models with the Camper longflap being the largest. I'm pretty sure they've been making them the same since before I was born. It was even signed by the person who did the stitching. Priscilla did mine. Again, you can get somewhat similar styles of bags from Velo Orange, Rivendell, and others in the US (Acorn, Minehaha) and I'm pretty sure someone imports Carradice to the US.

    Jonathan

  4. #4
    Registered User Fat Crip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gonty View Post
    Thanks for the compliments on the bike. For the record, the bars actually came from the US. They are called Oxford bars and are made by Soma Fabrications. You could also get a range of similar bars from Rivendell or Velo Orange, both of whom I shopped from to build this bike.

    Jonathan
    There's nothing like a bike you've built yourself, is there? Though I haven't been able to ride for 6 and a half years, and never will, I can't bring myself to part with my bikes ... they took too much time, effort and money to create to end up being sold on eBay for 500 ($750) for someone to trash.

    Eric

  5. #5
    Registered User Fat Crip's Avatar
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    I just had a look at the rest of your pics. At first glance your bike looks quaint and old fashioned - especially with the wooden grips and Brookes saddle - but in reality, it's anything but! More sort of state of the art retro. I bet its actually quite light and with a pretty slick drive train. I like it!

    Eric

  6. #6
    Registered User gonty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fat Crip View Post
    At first glance your bike looks quaint and old fashioned - especially with the wooden grips and Brookes saddle - but in reality, it's anything but! More sort of state of the art retro.
    Thanks! I'm quite proud of it.

    I was going for a classic sort of feel, except I didn't bother with the drivetrain which is essentially a modern MTB setup.

    Jonathan

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