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Thread: Tri-Star maiden voyage(s) + corgi eating ice cream

  1. #1
    Volunteer Moderator Badger's Avatar
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    Tri-Star maiden voyage(s) + corgi eating ice cream

    I've wanted a Tri-Star for what seems like ages, and I finally bit the bullet (Steel Dyneema/Steel) in time for two recent trips. No packing photos since you all know what all my stuff looks like at this point.

    Trip #1: Academic conference, 4 days
    Rear compartment, in Wasabi Packing Cube Backpack:
    Four t-shirts, two dress shirts, a tie (with flowers!), a sweater, a pair of shorts, socks n' smalls (enough for the whole trip, thanx, Janine).

    Middle compartment:
    15.4" non-retina MBP in third-party case; MPB charger; iPhone charger; Large Wasabi Dyneema OP with my conference paper, my colleagues' papers, and hardback edition of The Testament of Mary; honkin' huge and heavy hardback edition of We, the Drowned.

    Front compartment:
    Size 40 New Balance Minimus trainers; Steel Dyneema/Nylon Organizer Cube with dry toiletries; quart Ziploc bag with 311 toiletries; 3 Clif Bars and 5 individual servings of nuts; Small Steel Dyneema OP with Advil, lip balm, and mints; glasses and sunglasses in their respective cases; earbuds; Forest/Nordic Pocket Pouch with business cards; Mini Conifer OP with rosary (aka "I don't want the plane to crash" insurance).

    Front pockets:
    27-ounce Klean Kanteen with screw-top, Field Journal notebook, Zebra Sharbo-X LT3 multi-pen, my house/car keys, and a lighter.

    I wish I had known that the hotel wifi would be so crappy that I wouldn't be able to get any work done—if I had, I would have left the computer at home. I read about 400 pages of the big-ass novel, so I feel bringing it was worth the weight. During the conference, I used the PCBP as my daily carry, and it worked splendidly. On most of my flights, I had to stash the TS below the seat in front of me, and while it was a little difficult to wedge in because it kept knocking into my knees, I was able to fit my feet around it during the flight.

    Trip #2: Out-of-town long weekend, 3 days
    Immediately upon arriving home, I did laundry and re-packed for another trip, this time with the inestimable Kiddo; we packed both of our stuff into the Tri-Star.

    Rear compartment, in Wasabi Packing Cube Backpack:
    My clothes, which included: three T-shirts and one long-sleeved T-shirt, a long-sleeved collared shirt, a pair of shorts, socks n' things.

    Middle compartment:
    iPhone charger, Steel Dyneema/Nylon Organizer Cube with minimal toiletries since the hotel supplied decent ones, glasses, and my MCB, which held a notebook, a pen, earbuds, the Small Steel Dyneema OP, and some other miscellany, including Quiet, a book I'm using for some research.

    Front compartment, in large Western Flyer packing cube:
    Kiddo's clothes, which as I recall included two pairs of pants, some sweats, at least 5-6 shirts, a belt, and undergarments.

    Front pockets:
    nothing!

    I used the TS in backpack mode on my conference trip, and with the Absolute Strap on the weekend trip since we went by car. It worked great on both trips, and I especially like how much easier it was to carry shoes vs. in my Western Flyer. It's also quite possible that the PCBP has changed my life, but only time will tell.

    Would you like to see a picture of Titus eating ice cream, and Hector watching forlornly in the background? Here you go (and ignore my wrist, which was apparently suffering from elephantiasis):


  2. #2
    Registered User jannilee's Avatar
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    Love, love, love Quiet. So nice to read a book appreciating the strengths of introverts. Also SO true about introverts being better leaders for people with initiative because they have better listening skills.

  3. #3
    Volunteer Moderator Badger's Avatar
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    @jannilee, I have to say: Quiet is an amazing book. Finally, someone understands. So many parts of my profession require me to wear the bear-suit of extroversion and I definitely feel run-down after a while, but for the longest time I thought it was just some insufficiency on my part. It was nice to feel validated, haha.

    Your recent post on Iceland makes me want to force you, in the gentlest way possible, to read We, the Drowned. Granted, it's set in Denmark, not Iceland, but Carsten Jensen writes such marvelously evocative prose. It's not always beautiful, but it is breathtaking.

  4. #4
    Registered User jannilee's Avatar
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    Hmm. I'll check it out at the library. Icelanders, however are not overly fond of the Danes who ruled iceland for some time. Icelandic joke: Danish isn't a language - it's a throat disease.
    Bonus picture of Icelandic landscape. The tiny dots at the bottom are Asian tourists.

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    Last edited by jannilee; 03-23-2013 at 11:14 AM.
    lomo likes this.

  5. #5
    Volunteer Moderator Badger's Avatar
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    I have gathered that there's no love lost between the Icelanders and the Danes. I'm watching a Danish crime series right now (there are a ton of those, has anyone noticed?) and the main character is from Iceland. They never really talk about it, which seems odd to me.

    That's an awesome pic. I–I wish I was one of the Asian tourists in the photo. (makes an "I'm-sad-because-I-live-in-Iowa-and-never-go-anywhere-cool" face)

  6. #6
    Registered User jannilee's Avatar
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    You need to find or invent a conference on some abstruse topic in iceland. Or you could take a sabbatical and go investigate the effect of obscure saga fragments on the writing of... (Insert any group here). My favourite obscure saga fragment is the one about someone making a rude drawing on his outhouse wall and reciting a rude poem to it every time he used the outhouse. Times have not really changed much except that this one resulted in wiping out a number of people in revenge cycles on both sides.


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