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Thread: First Aid Kits

  1. #16
    TOM BIHN Crew (we work here) Darcy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NWhikergal View Post
    For a travel or daily lightweight kit, Adventure Medical Kits has a travel kit that has some of the commonly used items that might be handy, at least to consider for a starting point. It never hurts to add extra pain killers and bandages.
    Some great advice here from NWhikergal. I second the recommendation of Adventure Medical Kits. Plus, you can register your kit with them and receive reminders about refilling it.

    I think, for most people, if they have to really use their first aid kit -- and I mean the stuff besides the ibuprofen/acetaminophen, benedryl, and bandaids -- they'll remember to refill it because having an experience like that teaches them how incredibly important a first aid kit can be. It's the day-to-day, small incident pilfering of the afore-mentioned items from the kit that leads to issues. So, yeah: always good to carry extra ibuprofen/acetaminophen, benedryl, and bandaids.
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    moriond - you are AWESOME!! Thanks so much!!

    Quote Originally Posted by moriond View Post
    @haraya The reference on surviving an airplane crash was from this post (#5) in the 3 weeks across USA in June thread:


    HTH moriond

  3. #18
    Registered User Janine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by icebeng View Post
    Thanks for the links! I will peruse those threads for more advice!

    (And yes...everyone's okay! :-)
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  4. #19
    Registered User Janine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by moriond View Post
    And as a side searching tip, when you get messages that your search terms are too short or common, you can try putting wild cards in like "first*aid" or "first*aid*kit", or simply bypass the forum search and use Google (e.g. "Tom Bihn first aid kit")

    HTH moriond
    YES! That helps a million! I opened up all the links you provided for review, but I am especially grateful for the search help! :-)
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  5. #20
    Registered User Janine's Avatar
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    Either we are all accident-prone, or we all have scout training in our backgrounds. Thanks for all the great ideas!
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  6. #21
    Registered User terayon's Avatar
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    FWIW, this is what I think is worth putting in a EDC first aid kit.

    - band-aids
    - a few small (2x2") gauze pads
    - gloves
    - tweezers for splinters
    - ibuprofen, acetaminophen (doses for me and for kids), ranitidine, Gravol (for my middle daughter, sometimes known affectionately as Barfy)
    - duct tape or moleskin for blisters
    - rescue-breathing barrier
    - a 20-cc syringe for cleaning out a scrape (no needle necessary - I'm just squirting tap water over a patch of road rash)

    This all fits in a small clear OP.

    My criteria include:

    - light and out-of-the-way enough so that I don't consider taking it out of my bag;
    - the item in question would be something needed in an incident in which I might realistically encounter - for example, no snake-venom kits for me, living in central Canada; and
    - the item in question would be something needed in a relatively minor incident, as anything even remotely major is going to mean seeking help. (Other than the rescue-breathing barrier, which is a short-term item to be used until the ambulance arrives.)

  7. #22
    Nli
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    Quote Originally Posted by haraya View Post
    Interesting!! I like the longevity aspect in particular (both in and out of package) How are they to remove after such a long time, do you have to be careful about tearing skin?

    (Not so worried about myself, but I know now to steer clear of the "sport" and "heavy-duty" Band-aids because on my kids they've caused some minor re-injury upon removal - pulling on the healthy skin.)
    VERY easy to remove on short haired or hairless skin, pretty sticky on hairy legs, or so my son found. I cannot imagine they would hurt even infant skin. Another use: I suffer with split / cracked cuticles and fingertips (and lips!) in our harsh winters. These have been a godsend for my finger lesions, too. A dab of BITE lip balm on the lesion(s) (an incredible product for these, AND the best balm I have ever found for chronically chapped, split lips). Cover the finger tip with a Nexaband for 3-5 days and the lesions are gone. They are really great.
    haraya likes this.

  8. #23
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    A quick question for those of you with emergency/first aid kits in your cars:

    Do you find that supplies degrade faster because they are exposed to extreme heat and cold? Mr. Janine likes to keep a bottle of iiuprofin in the car but that creeps me out to no end. I imagine that the ibuprofin molecules mingle in unnatural ways in the heat of a closed car, transmogrifying the pills into little timebombs of radioactive insanity.

    (We just got done with story time and I'm a little wound up.)
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    I recall reading about a study that found that basic pills/caplets, like ibuprofen, are pretty inert and hold a significant percentage of their efficacy even after fourteen years. My guess is that capsules made from gelatin will not do well under extreme heat/cold (so I'd avoid those in favor of hard/solid formats).

    I'd also be leery of leaving creams or adhesives in the car. I found a small container of hand lotion in my car, left over from last winter, and I tossed it since it had gone all yellow and there looked to be separation into different layers. The ready-made FA kit that I put in my glove compartment? The Band-Aids had melded with their wrappings, the little packets of antiseptic cream had oozed out of the foil, and onto the gauze pads. If I need those things (or similar items), I'll just bring tiny quantities with me in my bag, so they're not subject to temperature extremes (or at least, not over extended periods).

    PS. Were you reading Calvin and Hobbes at story time, perchance?

    Quote Originally Posted by Janine View Post
    A quick question for those of you with emergency/first aid kits in your cars:

    Do you find that supplies degrade faster because they are exposed to extreme heat and cold? Mr. Janine likes to keep a bottle of iiuprofin in the car but that creeps me out to no end. I imagine that the ibuprofin molecules mingle in unnatural ways in the heat of a closed car, transmogrifying the pills into little timebombs of radioactive insanity.

    (We just got done with story time and I'm a little wound up.)
    Last edited by haraya; 07-14-2014 at 06:56 PM.

  10. #25
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    Nexaband
    Thank you, I will look these up!!

    I suffer with split / cracked cuticles and fingertips (and lips!) in our harsh winters.
    My husband gets the split fingertips, too. I gave him some of this stuff:

    Everything Balm

    It works wonders, where he couldn't get any relief from stuff that he got from the drugstore. I also keep a little bit of it in a small container (GoTubb) in my purse - it is great as an all-around moisturizer, lip balm, salve for paper cuts, even for minor scrapes. It does have a lot of essential oils, so the first whiff is bracing, but it fades quickly and doesn't bother me (unlike other scents, e.g. any kind of scented detergent). Alternately, I use these - Solid Lotion Bars (scroll down the page) - which come unscented or in other formulations, with lighter scents.

    (am not affiliated with her site, I just came across it thanks to Ravelry, and I love the things I've tried!)

    Quote Originally Posted by Nli View Post
    VERY easy to remove on short haired or hairless skin, pretty sticky on hairy legs, or so my son found. I cannot imagine they would hurt even infant skin. Another use: I suffer with split / cracked cuticles and fingertips (and lips!) in our harsh winters. These have been a godsend for my finger lesions, too. A dab of BITE lip balm on the lesion(s) (an incredible product for these, AND the best balm I have ever found for chronically chapped, split lips). Cover the finger tip with a Nexaband for 3-5 days and the lesions are gone. They are really great.
    Last edited by haraya; 07-14-2014 at 07:56 PM.

  11. #26
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    The advice to make up your own is a good one. Keeping supplies relatively fresh is as important as what you have in your kit. Those bandages aren't going to be a lot of good if they don't stick any more.

    My personal "kit" includes the medications I need for a day if I'm separated from my bags, or just forgot to take them in the morning. Any "emergency" meds like asthma inhalers, epi pens, or antihistamines need to be on the list. Past that, I tend to stick with what I know how to use which is a lot less than a wilderness-survivalist would haul along.

    Tweezers, both pointy and flat-angle tipped, have come in handy for more than "first aid" of people, as does the needle in a sewing kit, even if you aren't going to suture someone up with it.

    As a last resort, good pain killer may help you get to care if medical help isn't immediately available. Ibuprofen will do in a pinch. Be aware of both human sensitivities to various OTC analgesics, as well as that acetaminophen (aka paracetamol) is highly toxic to cats. Remember that pain killers will mask symptoms, making later professional diagnosis more difficult.

    Since 95% of my time isn't more than a phone call from emergency services, I don't carry a "fix-anything" kit everywhere. I figure that if I can prevent bleeding to excess and keep things clean, the professionals can handle the rest.

    If your kit might be helping others, avoid latex and soy (sometimes used as a filler in pills or a carrier like soy oil, check "other ingredients" lists) and anything else you think people around you might be sensitive to.

    My packing list for travel includes, among other things (and in no particular order):
    • Soap
    • Clean, microfiber washcloth
    • Clean handkerchiefs (both these and the washcloth can double as bandages, if needed)
    • Dental floss (general-purpose fine string)
    • Paracord (the real stuff)
    • Antibiotic ointment
    • Assorted bandages
    • Diphehydramine cream (anti-itch, "Benadryl")
    • Cetirizine liquid, gel-caps, or tablets (antihistamine, "Zyrtec")
    • Pseudoephedrine tablets (decongestant, "Sudafed" -- the real stuff that is behind the counter)
    • Terbinafine cream (antifungal, "Lamasil") (I've picked up some nasty foot fungus on hotel travel, much worse than the gym)
    • Ranitidine (antacid, "Zantac")
    • Preservative-free, lubricating eye drops
    • Tweezers, pointed and angle tips
    • Sewing kit (needle)
    • Lighter (can sanitize the above in a pinch)
    • Styptic pencil (shaving kit)
    • If checked baggage, both a good knife (Spyderco Ladybug in ZDP189, hand sharpened) and DE razor blades (shaving kit)
    • "Real" LED flashlight, with spare battery (Olight S10 or S15) -- so you can clearly see what you're doing
    • (Add in "cheater" glasses, if you need them)
    • Appropriate medical insurance documents


    I'll generally buy generics at Target as they are significantly less expensive than the name brands

  12. #27
    Registered User binje's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janine View Post
    A quick question for those of you with emergency/first aid kits in your cars:

    Do you find that supplies degrade faster because they are exposed to extreme heat and cold? Mr. Janine likes to keep a bottle of iiuprofin in the car but that creeps me out to no end. I imagine that the ibuprofin molecules mingle in unnatural ways in the heat of a closed car, transmogrifying the pills into little timebombs of radioactive insanity.

    (We just got done with story time and I'm a little wound up.)
    A pharmacist once told me that most drugs decrease in effectiveness about 5% per year so it's more likely that the ibuprofen simply won't work. Antibiotics are the big exception. Expired antibiotics can make you quite sick. I do keep a small tube of aspirin & naproxen in my car - it's deliberately small (about 10 tablets) so I know it's probably not too far gone. I would imagine that heat would speed the deterioration, but that cold would slow the process.

    I, too, have had an unpleasant experience with hand lotion separating. I took it out of the glove compartment, squeezed the tube, and sprayed a noxious oily liquid all over myself and my Crumpler camera bag that was sitting in my lap. No more lotions stored in the car! Or waxed dental floss.

  13. #28
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    Here is my EDC first aid stuff in a small COOP cayenne in color (love that color!)

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  14. #29
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    I keep the meds with me in my bag to try and keep ahead of the issue with heat/cold that could happen in the car. And I try and remember to check expiration dates on the meds whenever I take anything out to use, I check all the dates (unless the kid who is injured is screaming TOO loudly!!) oh, and in the same pocket of my bag as this case are always two lollipops. These are often more effective than bandaids.

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    Drug Expiration Dates — Do They Mean Anything?—The Family Health Guide

    "Most of what is known about drug expiration dates comes from a study conducted by the Food and Drug Administration at the request of the military. With a large and expensive stockpile of drugs, the military faced tossing out and replacing its drugs every few years. What they found from the study is 90% of more than 100 drugs, both prescription and over-the-counter, were perfectly good to use even 15 years after the expiration date."

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