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Thread: Using that bumper crop

  1. #1
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    Using that bumper crop

    Our little backyard garden went nuts this year--last weekend we harvested and froze 23 pounds of green beans, and this weekend it's savoy cabbage being processed for the winter.

    So, any special recipes for freezing garden produce to enjoy later on?

    Here's ours for curried savoy cabbage:

    Halve and thinly slice two large onions. Add to a generous sized pot in which you've gotten three or four tablespoons of a neutral vegetable oil nice and hot. Add a tablespoon of turmeric, a tablespoon of salt, anywhere from a teaspoon to a tablespoon of red pepper or cayenne pepper, a teaspoon or two of ground cumin. Stir till fragrant. Add the sliced onion and a generous amount of finely chopped fresh ginger--I use very young ginger so I use about a quarter cup; if I only had access to more mature ginger, I'd use half that amount. Saute till the onion is limp. Add 8-10 cups shredded savoy cabbage and toss it around from time to time till it is thoroughly wilted. Then add tomato--a couple of cups of homegrown tomatoes (peeled, seeded and chopped) if you have them, a can or two of diced tomatoes if you don't. Add a couple of tablespoons of lime juice and cook down till the mixture is reasonably dry. Then add a cup or two of plain yogurt, stir to incorporate, and serve. Or, as we will do, cool down and freeze in meal-sized containers.

    Of course, if you don't have pounds and pounds of savoy cabbage to deal with, the recipe can be easily scaled down. And Napa cabbage works well, too.

    This is the only cooked cabbage recipe my daughter ever loved.
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  2. #2
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    You'd keep this in the fridge, not the freezer, but man, I'd go kimchi all the way. A couple of summers ago I made some with cabbage from the store, and it kept really well for a couple months. I'm sure I could have kept it longer, but we um. Ate it all. Homemade is so much better than commercial; it's not as salty and you can make it as hot as you like do a vegetarian/vegan version. Maangchi at maangchi.com has many good kimchi recipes, both in terms of making the kimchi itself and using it in dishes.

    If I had lots of cucumber, I'd make pickles. Same with red onions. I'd also make a batch of cucumber vodka (if you have a lot of rosemary or basil, those are good additions to vodka as well; once again, you need to keep this in the fridge or freezer once you've made it and strained it).

    I'm curious about the "very young ginger." Where do you get that? I imagine it would make excellent syrup for homemade ginger ale, adding to compotes for ice cream or pancakes, or in cocktails.

  3. #3
    Registered User monkeylady's Avatar
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    I don't know where you live, but you might try storing some of your cabbage in the unheated garage. I store regular cabbage, carrots, potatoes, winter squashes, onion, and beets this way but winter temps in the Seattle area would rarely cause freezing in garage. You can find storage instructions on line. If your unheated garage freezes for any length of time, your cabbage might get mushy unless it is a variety that can stand in the field in winter.

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    On very young ginger: I get it in Seattle at our large Japanese grocery Uwajimaya. I suspect a lot of Asian groceries would stock it. I really like it because it is somewhat milder than the typical mature ginger and much less woody, so it's better for applications where you don't want chewy or fiber-y bits of ginger.

    If you're looking for a nice ginger syrup, there are jars of Korean and Chinese ginger 'tea' paste--it's already cooked down with sugar and strained. You just add hot water to make a nice spicy ginger drink, but you could also use it for other stuff. The brand we have is Ottogi--it keeps forever in the fridge!
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    An update--we harvested most of our savoy cabbage; it came to 36 pounds. I will be trying some as kimchi, but only a few pounds, I think. We like kimchi, but not 36 pounds worth of it!

    This has been a super-great garden year in Seattle--we've even gotten peppers this year, which we almost never do. (We grow them more for a lark than because we think we'll get much out of them.)

    Thanks for the suggestions--I'm still open to recipes if anyone has them!
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  6. #6
    Registered User itsablur's Avatar
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    How about stuffing them like cabbage rolls, cook, then freeze them? That's what my mother does with her cabbage crop (though not savoy cabbage).

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    Quote Originally Posted by flitcraft View Post
    On very young ginger: I get it in Seattle at our large Japanese grocery Uwajimaya. I suspect a lot of Asian groceries would stock it. I really like it because it is somewhat milder than the typical mature ginger and much less woody, so it's better for applications where you don't want chewy or fiber-y bits of ginger.

    If you're looking for a nice ginger syrup, there are jars of Korean and Chinese ginger 'tea' paste--it's already cooked down with sugar and strained. You just add hot water to make a nice spicy ginger drink, but you could also use it for other stuff. The brand we have is Ottogi--it keeps forever in the fridge!
    Oh, Uwajimaya, how I miss it. We have Mitsuwa Marketplace down in Chicago and it's very, very nice, but it's not Uwajimaya. Thanks for the tip re: Korean ginger tea paste; that's a great idea! Good luck with your cabbages.
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    Epicurus.com Recipes | Stuffed Savoy Cabbage

    An alternative to this recipe is to fill it with rice in tomato and herbs sauce.


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